June 07, 2014

MARK BRADFORD AT WHITE CUBE HONG KONG




MARK BRADFORD: NEW WORK AT WHITE CUBE HONG KONG
14 May, 2014 - 16 August 2014




MARK BRADFORD: NEW WORK AT WHITE CUBE HONG KONG
14 May, 2014 - 16 August 2014
White Cube Hong Kong is pleased to present a new exhibition by Los Angeles-based artist Mark Bradford. Known for his multi-layered collaged paintings incorporating materials found in the urban environment, Bradford has created a series of new works about Hong Kong that explore structures of power and politics through the lens of urban planning, in the world’s most densely populated city.
Using architectural floor plans for public housing in Hong Kong as a starting point, Bradford abstracts the formal compositions of the blueprints. Numerous layers of paper – remnants of billboard posters found in his neighbourhood, along with digitally-printed colour sheets and newsprint – are overlaid and then partially sanded, enabling the preliminary delineated forms to re-emerge. In works such as No More Pencils (2014) and Plan View 74 (2014), gestural passages of colour sweeping across the surface give way to an intricate maze of incisions that return the viewer to the original design. With each small square and rectangle divided, subdivided and partitioned into even smaller cage-like units, Bradford highlights the crisis in the lack of affordable living space in Hong Kong, where nearly half the population resides in cramped government-subsidised housing.
A perspectival elevation of another public housing project provides the basis for Circus(2014). Broad swathes of blue and turquoise paper are sanded and burnished to expose a dynamic framework of yellows and reds, adopting the characteristics of thermal imaging. The living conditions within public housing in Hong Kong remain a combustible political issue, which Bradford deftly fuses with formal abstraction, to create a manifestation he references as ‘social abstraction’.
South View (2014) and West View (2014), each a twenty-part work, feature framed sections of abstracted and partitioned housing, stacked one on top of the other to form a grid-like, frontal elevation of individual cubicles. The palette of greens and blues, cut through with convergent lines of vibrant yellow and rust red, present momentary and singular viewpoints, which together build into a fluid and harmonious composition. InMailing a Country 1-3 (2014) fresco-like fragmentary sections materialise like partial, mnemonic excavations.
You may visit two more news about Mark Bradford and his paintings to click below links.

http://mymagicalattic.blogspot.com.tr/2013/10/mark-bradford-exhibition-at-white-cube.html






Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang




VISIBLE GIANT 2014
Mixed media on canvas - 213.4 x 274.3 cm
Photo: Joshua White




Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang






Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang




GRIDS ARE NOT FLAT 2014
Mixed media on canvas - 182.9 x 121.9 cm
Photo: Joshua White




Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang




Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang




NO MORE PENCILS 2014
Mixed media on canvas - 182.9 x 243.8 cm
Photo: Joshua White




Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang




PLAN VIEW 74 - 2014
Mixed media on canvas - 182.9 x 121.9 cm
Photo: Joshua White




























Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang




SOUTH VIEW 2014 ( DETAIL )
Mixed media on canvas - 20 parts, each:
27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed) - 39.4 x 31.8 cm (framed)
Photo: Joshua White
 




SOUTH VIEW 2014 ( DETAIL )
Mixed media on canvas - 20 parts, each:
27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed) - 39.4 x 31.8 cm (framed)
Photo: Joshua White
 




SOUTH VIEW 2014 ( DETAIL )
Mixed media on canvas - 20 parts, each:
27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed) - 39.4 x 31.8 cm (framed)
Photo: Joshua White
 




SOUTH VIEW 2014 
Mixed media on canvas - 20 parts, each:
27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed) - 39.4 x 31.8 cm (framed)
Photo: Joshua White
 




WEST VIEW - 2014 ( DETAIL )
Mixed media on canvas
20 parts, each: 27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed)
15 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (39.4 x 31.8 cm) (framed)
Photo: Joshua White




WEST VIEW - 2014 ( DETAIL )
Mixed media on canvas
20 parts, each: 27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed)
15 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (39.4 x 31.8 cm) (framed)
Photo: Joshua White




WEST VIEW - 2014 ( DETAIL )
Mixed media on canvas
20 parts, each: 27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed)
15 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (39.4 x 31.8 cm) (framed)
Photo: Joshua White




WEST VIEW - 2014 
Mixed media on canvas
20 parts, each: 27.9 x 21.6 cm (unframed)
15 1/2 x 12 1/2 in. (39.4 x 31.8 cm) (framed)
Photo: Joshua White




SPIDERS FEET 2012




MAILING A COUNTRY 3 - 2014
Mixed media on canvas
127 x 119.4 cm (unframed) - 218.4 x 202.6 cm (framed)
Photo: Joshua White




Mark Bradford Exhibition’s View From White Cube
Photo: Vincent Tsang




MAILING A COUNTRY 2 - 2014
Mixed media on canvas
137.2 x 162.6 cm (unframed) - 218.4 x 228.6 cm (framed)
Photo: Joshua White




MAILING A COUNTRY 1 - 2014
Mixed media on canvas
154.9 x 254 cm (unframed) - 218.4 x 300.4 cm (framed)
Photo: Joshua White




A WITCH IN A BOTTLE 2012












MARK BRADFORD
Known for his expansive multi-layered collaged paintings incorporating materials found in the urban environment, Mark Bradford’s work addresses spontaneous systems and networks that materialise within cities, such as alternative economic exchange, itinerant communities, and other socio-political pathways.
Visually complex and often cartographic in form, Bradford’s paintings incorporate elements of the everyday – from end papers used for perming hair (associated with his background in hairdressing) to remnants of billboard posters, polyester cord, caulking, bleaching agents and carbon paper. Using such materials gathered within the locale of his studio in South Central Los Angeles, Bradford's paintings are ostensibly abstract in a formal sense, but referential in content. At first glance, the work corresponds with that of ‘Affichiste’ artists such as Raymond Hains and Jacques Villeglé; yet Bradford is less concerned with a commentary on consumerism, than with the specific conditions that shape communities. This is most clearly identified in the works featuring what he terms as ‘merchant posters’ found in his immediate neighbourhood. Affixed to cyclone fencing, erected around buildings left derelict after the 1992 Los Angeles riots, these billposters advertise, in bold graphics, services targeted directly at local inhabitants. The topics – ranging from foreclosure and paternity testing to loan credit and pest control – coalesce to form a narrative of desolation and, as Bradford has observed, reveal 'the invisible underbelly of a community'. In ‘A Thousand Daddies’, for example, multiple billboards advertising child custody services provide the foundation, with the letters broadly outlined in cord, over which layers of other posters and paper are pasted before being sanded back in part. This process of décollage or accretion reveals glimpses of luminous colour from the notices buried within.
Bradford’s practice also encompasses video, prints and sculptural installations. For the 55th Carnegie International in 2008, he created an installation for the rooftop of the museum. In reference to the stranded victims of Hurricane Katrina, he spelled out the words ‘HELP US’ in white stones, which was only visible from an aerial viewpoint. Later that year, Bradford created ‘Mithra’, regarded as one of the most iconic works of the ‘Prospect: New Orleans’ biennial. A three-storey ‘ark’ made from stacked shipping containers positioned on a vacant plot in the Lower Ninth Ward, the sculpture’s immense surface was covered in battered poster boards and advertising found around the city in the wake of the disaster. As one commentator noted, it could be simultaneously read as ‘a monument to futility or a symbolic cry for salvation’.
Mark Bradford was born in 1961 in Los Angeles, where he lives and works. He has exhibited widely, including groups shows such as the 12th Istanbul Biennial (2011), Seoul Biennial (2010),  the Carnegie International (2008), São Paulo Biennial (2006), and Whitney Biennial (2006). Solo exhibitions include, Aspen Art Museum (2011),  ‘Maps and Manifests’ at Cincinnati Museum of Art (2008) and '‘Neither New Nor Correct’ at the Whitney Museum of American Art (2007). In 2009, Mark Bradford was the recipient of the MacArthur Foundation ‘Genius’ Award. In 2010, ‘You’re Nobody (Til Somebody Kills You), a large-scale survey of his work was presented at the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, before travelling to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Dallas Museum of Art; and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.