October 28, 2014

MUSEO CASA ENZO FERRARI DESIGN BY JAN KAPLICKY & ANDREA MORGANTE






MUSEO CASA ENZO FERRARI DESIGN BY JAN KAPLICKY & ANDREA MORGANTE




MUSEO CASA ENZO FERRARI DESIGN BY JAN KAPLICKY & ANDREA MORGANTE
Ferrari automotive museum designed by the late Czech architect, Future System’s founder Jan Kaplický, has opened in Modena, Italy.
Following Kaplický’s death in early 2009, the Enzo Ferrari Museum has been completed by London practice Shiro Studio under the direction of former Future Systems associate Andrea Morgante.
The museum comprises two buildings. The first is the early nineteenth century former house and workshop of Ferrari’s father, renovated to house a 40-metre-long gallery, while the second is a new glass-fronted structure that curves around it.
COMPREHENSIVE PROJECT DESCRIPTION FROM ANDREA MORGANTE:
Enzo Ferrari Museum, Modena, Italy
In 2004 Future Systems won an international competition to design a new museum in Modena, Italy. Dedicated to motor racing legend and entrepreneur Enzo Ferrari (1898 – 1988), the museum comprises exhibition spaces within the early nineteenth century house where the motor racing giant was born and raised, and its adjoining workshop, as well as a separate, newly constructed exhibition building.
Following the death of Jan Kaplicky in 2009, the office of Future Systems was dissolved ¹. Andrea Morgante, formerly of Future Systems and now director of Shiro Studio, was appointed to oversee the museum's completion. The new building has been constructed to Kaplický's original design– it is sensitive to the existing historical context, combines the latest in construction and energy saving technology, and resonates in spirit, language and materials with the cars it is intended to showcase. The fully restored house and workshop provide additional exhibition space designed by Morgante.
New Exhibition Building
The sculpted yellow aluminium roof with its ten incisions – intentionally analogous to those air intake vents on the bonnet of a car – allows for natural ventilation and day lighting, and both celebrates and expresses the aesthetic values of car design. With its 3,300 square metres of double-curved aluminium, the roof is the first application of aluminium in this way on such a large scale. Working together with boat builders whose familiarity with organic sculpted forms and waterproofing made them the ideal partner, and cladding specialists, the form is constructed from aluminium sheets fitted together using a patented tongue and groove system. The bright Modena yellow of the roof is Ferrari’s corporate colour, as seen on the Ferrari insignia where it forms the backdrop to the prancing horse. It is also the official colour of Modena.
Kaplický wanted to create a sensitive dialogue between the two exhibition buildings that showed consideration for Ferrari’s early home and underscored the importance of the museum as a unified complex made up of several elements. The views out of the new exhibition building dramatically frame the house and workshop, while views from outside the house and workshop immediately reveal the function and content of the new exhibition building. The height of the new exhibition building reaches a maximum of 12 metres – the same height as the house – with its volume expanding below ground level. In addition, the new building gently curves around the house in a symbolic gesture of appreciation.
The glass façade is curved in plan and tilts at an angle of 12.5 degrees. Each pane is supported by pre-tensioned steel cables and is able to withstand 40 tonnes of pressure. The technical specification of these panes and cables means that greater transparency in the façade is achieved with maximum functionality. In the summer months a thermo-sensor activates the windows in the façade and roof allowing cool air to circulate. The building also employs photovoltaic technology and water recycling systems.
Visitors entering the new building have uninterrupted views into the entire exhibition space: a large, open, white room, where the walls and floor transition lightly into one another and are perceived as a single surface. A stretched semi-transparent membrane spreads light evenly across the roof, and in combination with the slits running from side to side which allow air to escape and give a ribbed effect, recalls the language of a car interior. A bookshop and café are situated to one side of the entrance and facilities to the other. Both are painted the same Modena yellow as the roof and take the form of blister-like pods. A gently sloping ramp gradually leads the visitor around the building from the ground floor to the basement level, with display stands designed by Morgante punctuating the circulation path. These stands lift the cars 45 centimetres so that they can be viewed from different angles and appreciated as works of art rather than objects simply placed in a room. Up to twenty-one cars can be displayed in this open space at any one time. Supplementary exhibition material is displayed in leather cases located along the perimeter wall. At the bottom of the ramp and directly below the entrance, an audiovisual room forms a permanent part of the exhibition. A flexible teaching space and a conference room with a carved out opening allowing views up into the entrance area are located next to it.
Restored House and Workshop
The two-storey house and workshop built by Ferrari’s father in the 1830s has been completely refurbished. Later additions to the house and workshop have been removed and, with the exception of two internal bracing structures that have been inserted in accordance with Italian anti-seismic regulations to give structural rigidity, no alterations have been made. The main gallery space is located within what was the double height workshop. Here Morgante has designed a contemporary exhibition display system, which incorporates digital projections, objects owned by Ferrari, information panels and other material.
The display system was conceived as a large-scale vertical book that allows the visitor to read the different chapters of Ferrari’s life through various media; a three-dimensional immersive biography. The system takes the form of a sinuous wall separated into pages, so that as visitors progress down the room, they are obliged to gradually discover each page and chapter in sequence. At every point the next chapter is concealed so as to maintain interest and create a sense of excitement. This organic landscape stretches through the entire length of the 40 metre long space and soft, low-level backlighting gently illuminates both it and the room, making the space intimate in spite of its size. At the northern end of the main gallery, in the original house, two smaller exhibition spaces are located next to one another. Administrative spaces are situated directly adjacent to them and on the first floor.
























Photograph by Andrea Morgante






Photograph by Andrea Morgante

























YOU MAY WATCH VIDEO FROM MUSEO CASA ENZO FERRARI
ENZO FERRARI IN THE TIME MACHINE

























© Studio Cento29




Photograph by Andrea Morgante




Photograph by Andrea Morgante




© Studio Cento29




Photograph by Andrea Morgante




Photograph by Andrea Morgante




© Studio Cento29














© Studio Cento29












Photograph by Andrea Morgante






















© Studio Cento29






© Studio Cento29














© Studio Cento29




ANDREA MORGANTE
Shiro Studio is a London based design practice established by Andrea Morgante in 2009, committed to the creation of unique architecture and objects. We believe in integrity of materials, purity of perception, coherence. We believe objects and architecture should be tactile, evocative and unexpected. Nature's efficiency, digital fabrication and art are recurrent trajectories of investigation that permeate our visual language and design process.
Shiro means ‘white’ in Japanese, but here it implies a philosophical translation where white is perceived as the purest creative approach. Shiro is the infinitesimal fraction of time before an idea is represented on a blank piece of white paper. It is here, in this tension between inception and the beginning of the design process, that the purity and integrity of creativity is found.
Andrea Morgante is a registered ARB RIBA Architect in the UK. After working in 1997 with RMJM in London he joined Future Systems in 2001 where he became Associate Director, working closely alongside the late Jan Kaplicky. In 2008 he collaborated with Ross Lovegrove, developing a number of innovative self-sufficient energy projects. In 2012 Andrea completed the construction of the Enzo Ferrari Museum in Italy.
Shiro Studio is continuously engaged in architecture and product design. Since 2009 the studio has completed projects for, amongst others, Ferrari, Alessi, M&C Saatchi, Peroni, D-Shape, Agape, Poltrona Frau, Seiko Japan, Electa. Andrea's work has been extensively published on numerous magazines and book, including Wallpaper, Casabella, IW, Casa Brutus, The Independent, Architect's Journal, Blueprint, Icon, Interni, Stella Magazine.










JAN KAPLICKY
Jan Kaplicky (18 April 1937 – 14 January 2009) was world-renowned Czech architect who spent a big part of his life in the United Kingdom. He was the leading architect behind the innovative design studio, Future System. He studied at the collage of Applied Arts – Architecture and Design (VSUP) in Prague. After the Soviet invasion he escaped to London in September 1968. In England Kaplicky worked for Denys Lasdun and Partners (till 1971), next in the office of Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers (till 1973). In the year 1979 Kaplicky set up his own architectural think tank called Future Systems with David Nixon and began to develop an architectural style that combined organic forms with high tech futurism. In the year 1994 was Future System commissioned to build the new media centre at Lord’s Cricket Ground, which won in the year 1999 the Stirling Price by Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), the most prestigious architecture award in the UK, and the World Architecture Awards in 2001. The next Future System’s iconic project was Selfridges Building in Birmingham, which won seven awards including RIBA Award for Architecture 2004. In February 2007 Kaplicky won international architectural competition for the new building of the National Library of the Czech Republic in Prague, but the project was subsequently cancelled.
http://kaplickycentre.org/en/archive/jan-kaplicky#.VE-6tSKsW0c
ARCHITECTURE
The question was how to represent new thinking in a new way. How to show new types of buildings that somebody would like and understand. Maybe even the desire to shock a little bit. A new way of how to rediscover my shuttered identity. How to find new form. How to be artistic. How to introduce new reality. How to introduce the realism of the site. Photomontage is a relatively fast technique.
Certainly a technique introduced many decades ago. It is also an attempt to watercolour perspectives of the day. Of course this was a long time before it was possible to use the computer for such processes. It was a personal product. I still resent the anonymity of computer drawing. It still has little unique feeling.
Computer images can promote bad architecture. The difference between good or bad is almost zero. But the unique personal touch is returning. We are almost there with Future Systems´ unique computer-generated photomontage. It is after all the year 2002. The third millennium. (source: Jan Kaplicky. 2002. Confessions: Principles Architecture Process Life. Great Britain: Wiley Academy.)
http://kaplickycentre.org/en/archive/jan-kaplicky/architecture






Below Photograph Had Taken by Andrea Morgante