November 09, 2014

SPANISH PAINTER PABLO PICASSO


A
SPANISH PAINTER PABLO PICASSO
EXPERIMENTATION OF ART
A
b
SPANISH PAINTER PABLO PICASSO
EXPERIMENTATION OF ART
Spanish painter, sculptor, draughtsman, printmaker, decorative artist and writer, active in France. He dominated 20th-century European art and was central in the development of the image of the modern artist. Episodes of his life were recounted in intimate detail, his comments on art were published and his working methods recorded on film. Painting was his principal medium, but his sculptures, prints, theatre designs and ceramics all had an impact on their respective disciplines. Even artists not influenced by the style or appearance of his work had to come to terms with its implications.
With Georges Braque Picasso was responsible for Cubism, one of the most radical re-structurings of the way that a work of art constructs its meaning. During his extremely long life Picasso instigated or responded to most of the artistic dialogues taking place in Europe and North America, registering and transforming the developments that he found most fertile. His marketability as a unique and enormously productive artistic personality, together with the distinctiveness of his work and practice, have made him the most extensively exhibited and discussed artist of the 20th century.
http://www.moma.org/collection/artist.php?artist_id=4609
You may visit Pablo Picasso exhibition news at Art Instıtute of Chicago to click below link.

http://mymagicalattic.blogspot.com/2013/04/picasso-chicago-at-art-institute-chicago.html




ETCHING: 1,5 MARCH 1972
From 156 Series
Etching, Dry Point and Aquatint on Paper
Dimensions Unconfirmed: 370 x 500 mm
Collection: Tate




STUDY FOR LES DEMOISELLES D’AVIGNON 1907
Oil on Canvas - 18.5 x 20.3 cm
Credit Line: Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society , New York




 THE TABLE FROM SAINT MATOREL
Author: MaxJacob
August 1910, Published 1911
Etching From an Illustrated Book with Four Etchings, One With Dry Point
Dimensions: Plate: 20 x 14.2 cm; Sheet: 26.2 x 21.4 cm
Credit Line: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




HEAD ( STUDY FOR LES DEMOISELLES D’AVIGNON ) - 1906
Watercolor on Paper - 22.4 x 17.5 cm
Credit Line: The John S. Newberry Collection
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




MAN WITH GUITAR
1915, published 1929
Engraving, Drypoint, Andaquatint
Dimensions: Plate: 15.5 x 11.5 cm; Sheet (irreg.): 28.3 x 19.4 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. WalterBareiss
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




PIPE, GLASS, BOTTLE OF RUM - MARCH 1914
Cut-and-Pasted Colored Paper, Printed Paper, and Painted Paper,
Pencil, and Gouache on Prepared Board
Dimensions: 40 x 52.7 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Mr. And Mrs. Daniel Saidenberg
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




WOMAN WITH TAMBOURINE
Beginning of 1939, Published 1943
Etching and Aquatint
Dimensions: Plate: 66.7 x 51.2 cm; Sheet: 76 x 56.5 cm
Credit Line: Acquired Through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




STUDIO WITH PLASTER HEAD
Juan-les-Pins, summer 1925
Oil on canvas - 97.9 x 131.1 cm
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




PAINTER WORKING, OBSERVED BY NUDE MODEL
Plate VIII from the  Illustrated Book Le Chef-D'Oeuvreinconnu
 (Printexecuted 1927-1928) - Etching
Dimensions: Plate: 19.4 x 27.9 cm; Page: 33 x 25.2 cm
Credit Line: The Louis E. Stern Collection
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




MAN WITH A HAT 1912
Cut-and-Pasted Colored Paper and Printed Paper, Charcoal, and Ink on Paper
Dimensions: 62.2 x 47.3 cm
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




WOMAN WITH A GUITAR
Paris, March 1914
Oil, Sand, and Charcoal on Canvas - 115.5 x 47.5 cm
Credit Line: Gift of Mr. And Mrs. David Rockefeller
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 




CARD PLAYER
Paris, Winter 1913-14
Oil on canvas - 108 x 89.5 cm
Credit Line: Acquired Through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




NUDE WOMAN, STANDING 1912
Ink and Pencil on aper - 30.7 x 18.7 cm
Credit Line: Louise Reinhardt Smith Bequest
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




STILL LIFE 1912




STUDY OF PROFILES  DECEMBER 8, 1948)
Lithograph
Dimensions: Composition: 73.3 x 55 cm; Sheet: 75 x 56.3 cm
Credit Line:Mrs. Bertram Smith Fund
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




THE DEPARTURE -  MAY 20, 1951
Lithograph
Dimensions: Composition: 53.8 x 64.9 cm; Sheet: 53 x 64.9 cm
Credit Line: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




THE EMBRACE. III FROM THE VOLLARD SUITE
April 23, 1933, Printed 1939 - Drypoint
Dimensions: Plate: 29.6 x 36.5 cm; Sheet: 34 x 45.1 cm
Credit Line: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




NUDE WOMAN IN A RED ARMCHAIR 1932
Oil Paint on Canvas
Dimensions Support: 1299 x 972 mm
Collection: Tate








































BUSTE D'HOMME




WOMAN AT THE WINDOW 1952
Medium Aquatint and Dry Point on Paper
Dimensions: 902 x 635 mm
Collection: Tate




THE CHARNEL HOUSE , 1944-45
Oil and Charcoal on Canvas - 199.8 x 250.1 cm
Credit Line: Mrs. Sam A. Lewisohn Bequest (by exchange), and Mrs. Marya Bernard Fund in Memory of Her Husband Dr. Bernard Bernard, and Anonymous Funds
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




THE CONVENT FROM SAINT MATOREL 1911
Author: MaxJacob
Etching From an Illustrated Book With Four Etchings, One With Dry Point
Dimensions: Plate: 19.9 x 14.2 cm ; Sheet (irreg.): 26.1 x 20.6 cm
Credit Line: Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




PORTRAIT OF JACQUELINE WITH GLOSSY HAIR
 Feb. 16, 1962, Published 1963 - Linoleum Cut
Dimensions: Composition: 63.8 x 52.5 cm; Sheet: 75 x 61.9 cm
Credit Line: Gift of the Saidenberg Gallery, New York
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




THREE STANDING NUDES, WITH SKETCHES OF FACES
Plate IX From the Illustrated Book Le Chef-D'Oeuvre In Connu
 (Print executed 1927-1928) - Etching
Dimensions: Plate: 19.4 x 27.8 cm; Page: 33 x 25.2 cm
Credit Line: The Louis E. Stern Collection
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




ACCORDIONIST CERET 1911




STILL LIFE WITH BOTTLE OF MARC
1911, Published 1912 - Drypoint
Dimensions: Plate: 49.8 x 30.5 cm; Sheet (irreg.): 62 x 42.4 cm
Credit Line: Acquired Through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




PIPE, GLASS, BOTTLE OF VIEUX MARCH - PARIS 1914




WOMAN SITTING ON AN ARMCHAIR 1941




VIOLIN AND GRAPES 1912
Oil on canvas - 61 x 50.8 cm
Credit Line: Mrs. David M. LevyBequest
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




BOTTLE OF VIEUX MARC, GLASS, GUITAR & NEWSPAPER 1913




WOMAN DRESSING HER HAIR
Royan, June 1940
Oil on Canvas 
Dimensions: 130.1 x 97.1 cm
Credit Line: Louise Reinhardt Smith Bequest
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




GIRL WITH A MANDOLIN 1910




STUDY FOR A CONSTRUCTION 1912
Ink on Transparentized Paper
Dimensions: 17.1 x 12.7 cm
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




LIFE 1903
Oil on Canvas - 196.5 × 129.2 cm
Scala / Art Resource, NY / Picasso, Pablo (1881-1973) © ARS, NY
The Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland




PIERROT & RED HARLEQUIN, STANDING - 
C. 1920 - Stencil
Dimensions: Composition: 27.5 x 21.3 cm; Sheet: 30.5 x 23.8 cm
Credit Line: Lillie P. Bliss Collection
© 2014 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York




GUERNICA 1937 REINA SOFIA








A
2. PRIMITIVISM & CUBISM 1906 - 1915
Source: Oxford University Press
In his paintings immediately prior to the early Cubist paintings of 1908, Picasso had initiated the breakdown of illusionistic space that he was to pursue with an apparently greater intellectual rigour through Cubism, a style that over the course of a decade secured his prominent place in the history of 20th-century art. For Picasso, however, the restraint of Cubism was preceded by works exhibiting a raw intensity and violence in part stimulated by his reading of non-Western art, and aligned with European currents of primitivism (see Primitivism, §2). This dialogue of apparently contrasting positions, between the intellect and the emotions, between forms of classicism and expressionism and between the conscious and the unconscious, provided the dynamic of much of Picasso’s work.

Picasso and Fernande Olivier spent the summer of 1906 in Gosol, a remote Catalan village in the Pyrenees where he came to terms with his experience of Iberian sculptures from Osuna, which he had seen in the Louvre in the spring. He began in his work to make reference to forms of archaic art and to make expressive use of distortion with insistently rhythmical repetitions and contrasts. In Gosol, Picasso made his first carved sculptures. The resistance of wood produced simplified forms akin to those in his paintings. Gauguin’s work in the same medium, the most immediate European precedent available to Picasso, had been known to him through Paco Durio, a previous tenant in the Bateau-Lavoir; its primitivism had been given authority by the retrospective held at the Salon d’Automne in 1906, and it offered access to another major stimulus, the art of the Pacific Islands. At the same Salon ten paintings by the recently deceased Cézanne were exhibited. Resolving his response to the achievements of these two artists preoccupied Picasso over the next year and helped define his later work. On his return to Paris, Picasso quickly completed his portrait of Gertrude Stein (1906; New York, Met.; for illustration see Stein, (3)), which had been left partly obliterated in the spring after over 80 sittings, giving her a mask-like visage of monumental chiselled forms compressed within a shallow space. The Stein portrait stands as a crucial shift from observation to conceptualization in Picasso’s practice.
A
A
( I ) ‘LES DEMOISELLES D' AVIGNON
The primitivism of Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907; New York, MOMA) was more shocking still. While it gestated from a series of preparatory drawings and underwent major overpaintings during its production, it does not so much summarize Picasso’s previous work as reframe his understanding of painting; he called it his ‘first exorcism picture’. This radical picture, seen by friends in his studio and designated by various appellations, was put aside and shown publicly only in 1916, when it was given its present title by Salmon. It was purchased by the couturier Jacques Doucet in 1924 and acquired by the Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1939 at the time of Picasso’s retrospective. Embedded in its matrix are the vestiges of Picasso’s encounters with 19th-century artists: Ingres, Manet, Delacroix, Cézanne and Gauguin. Initially conceiving it as a narrative brothel scene, Picasso changed it to a vertical format, adopted a more discontinuous sense of space for the setting, removed the male visitors and reorientated the women to confront the (implicitly male) viewer. Controversy surrounded its stylistic disjunctures, confused by Picasso’s own equivocal statements. Rubin (1984) has argued that Picasso reworked the painting in late June and early July after a visit to the African and Oceanic collections in the Musée d’Ethnographie du Trocadéro in Paris. Although the painting has defeated most efforts to specify African or Pacific sources, it records Picasso’s reassessment of Gauguin’s primitivism and attests to the revelations accorded by forms of non-Western carving in terms of conceptual principles of representation and an emotively powerful evocation of magic and ritual. Linking eroticism and the fear of death, the Demoiselles fixed an image that was savage in style and violent in its dismemberment of the female body.
In paintings such as Mother and Child (1907; Paris, Mus. Picasso, 19) and wood-carvings such as Figure (1907; Paris, Mus. Picasso, 238), Picasso probed the fetishistic and conceptually simplifying aspects of primitivism. Although the juxtaposition of discordant elements in the Demoiselles gave way to internal pictorial coherence, in general his work of the following year displays an astonishing diversity of handling. Picasso sundered and isolated illusionistic conventions, using bright hues contrasted with subdued greys and earth colours, striated hatchings against angular crumpled planes, and rhythmic repetitions paired with bar-like outlines. In still-lifes painted in spring and summer 1908 and landscapes executed in August at La Rue-des-Bois, Picasso continued to reflect on the work both of Cézanne, which he had studied in depth at the retrospective held at the Salon d’Automne of 1907, and of Henri Rousseau, whom Picasso and Olivier fêted with a banquet in November.

By October 1907, and probably earlier in the spring of that year, Apollinaire had introduced Georges Braque to Picasso. In the winter of 1908–9 Picasso repainted his monumental Three Women (St Petersburg, Hermitage). Possibly in response to Braque’s Cézanne-influenced landscapes from the summer, in this work and a number of still-lifes Picasso imposed a more consistent control both on the surface and on illusions of space, after the example of Cézanne but with a greater concern for physicality. In contrast to Picasso’s usual assertive individualism, the invention of Cubism was such a joint effort that even he and Braque sometimes had difficulty in distinguishing each other’s work; Braque later described their relationship as that of mountaineers roped together.








( II ) ANALYTICAL CUBISM
In summer 1909 Picasso and Olivier spent four months at Horta de Ebro, where he made views of the village and landscape not only in paintings and drawings but also in photographs. The spatial continuity he admired in Cézanne’s work was treated in his own paintings, such as House on the Hill, Horta de Ebro (1909; New York, MOMA), in terms of nearly monochromatic tilted facets that fragment forms into a flow of light-dispersing surfaces. These discoveries were taken one stage further in pictures made in 1910 during a visit to the Catalan town of Cadaqués in the company of André Derain and his wife. In these works facets seem to be depleted of their substance, leaving a fragmented scaffolding of vestigial planar edges. In a series of etchings illustrating Jacob’s Saint-Matorel (1911; Paris, Geiser, 1933, nos 23–6) Picasso moved towards images that were increasingly transparent and difficult to interpret. The growing discontinuity of figurative fragments that characterized these methods, which came to be labelled Analytical Cubism, was especially apparent in three portraits of art dealers: Ambroise Vollard (spring 1910; Moscow, Pushkin Mus. F. A.)Wilhelm Uhde (spring 1910; St Louis, MO, Joseph Pulitzer priv. col., see Zervos cat. rais., ii, no. 217) and Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (autumn, 1910; Chicago, IL, A. Inst.). While experiments in painting and sculpture had been closely interconnected in Picasso’s primitivism, in his Analytical Cubist phase he produced only Head of a Woman (Fernande) (1909; Paris, Mus. Picasso, 243) and two less satisfactory sculptures.
Picasso signalled his disaffection with the bohemian existence of the Bateau-Lavoir by moving in the autumn of 1909 to a new studio and apartment with maid in the vicinity of the Place Pigalle; he and Fernande began to hold regular open house there on Sundays. He sold paintings to the Russian collector Sergey Shchukin and to Gertrude Stein and Vollard, and exhibited internationally from Moscow to New York in 1910–12. Like Braque, however, with whom he worked very closely in this period, Picasso refused to participate in the Salon d’Automne or the Salon des Indépendants, in spite of the growing number of adherents of Cubism who made use of the Salons as a platform for their work.

After working with Braque at Céret in August 1911, Picasso was forced to return hastily to Paris in early September. The confession by Apollinaire’s friend Géry Piéret to the theft of several sculptures, including two Iberian heads sold to Picasso in 1907, had led to Apollinaire’s arrest for the theft of the Mona Lisa from the Louvre. Although Apollinaire was later exonerated, he and Picasso both suffered concern for their status as foreign residents. The autumn marked a change in Picasso’s personal life. He began a liaison with Eva Gouel (Marcelle Humbert), whose presence in his life he commemorated not in portraits but in the words ‘ma jolie’, taken from a popular song, which he applied to the surface of paintings such as Woman with Guitar (‘Ma Jolie’) (1911–12; New York, MOMA). During his stay at Céret, Picasso had begun to deal openly again with more easily legible imagery after his experiments in the spring with nearly abstract paintings (sometimes labelled Hermetic Cubism). Using a pictorial scaffolding that coincided more clearly with the placement of still-life objects, Picasso filled the interstices with a scintillating touch similar to that used by the Neo-Impressionists. Following Braque’s example he employed stencilled lettering, which he soon exploited in verbal puns, masked meanings and multiple readings.
A
A
( III ) FIRST COLLAGES

After painting still-lifes that employed lettering, trompe l’oeil effects, colour and textured paint surfaces, Picasso produced Still-life with Chair-caning (May 1912; Paris, Mus. Picasso, 36; for illustration), an oval picture suggesting a café table in perspective surrounded by a frame made of rope. This was the first example of collage, a form of painting or drawing that incorporates pre-existing materials or objects as part of the surface. On to the painted background Picasso applied a piece of oil-cloth printed with an illusionistic chair-caning pattern: the very kind of cloth commonly used as a table-covering in working-class kitchens. The three letters written just above the chair-caning, JOU, can be interpreted both as a fragment of the noun JOURNAL and as a verb indicating Picasso’s perception of his activity as a form of play. In the same year, probably following the invention of collage, Picasso applied similar principles to sculpture in three-dimensional constructions beginning with Guitar (cardboard, 1912; New York, MOMA). A revelation from African art, a Grebo mask, catalysed Picasso’s vision of the possibilities of spatially disjunctive arrangements of signs for object, form and volume. His invention of this radical new sculptural form was to have enormous repercussions not only for his own later work but also for later developments in modern sculpture.






A
( IV ) PAPIERS COLLES & SYNTHETIC CUBISM
Picasso and Eva Gouel spent the summer of 1912 in Céret, Avignon and Sorgues, where they were joined by the Braques, but returned briefly to Paris in September to move into a new studio found for them by Kahnweiler on the Boulevard Raspail; at the end of the year Picasso signed a three-year contract with Kahnweiler, granting him exclusive purchase rights over his paintings. At Sorgues in mid-September Picasso saw Braque’s first papier collé, a variation of collage that employed not only ready-made materials such as newspapers but also purely invented shapes cut out of sheets of blank paper. On his return to Paris in October, Picasso also began to produce works in this medium, for example Violin and Sheet of Music (autumn 1912; Paris, Mus. Picasso, 368). Both collage and papier collé offered a new method not only of suggesting space but also of replacing conventional forms of representation with fragments of images that function as signs. They provided, in other words, a radically new way of dealing with the pictorial language that Picasso had been prising apart and isolating since the Demoiselles. Pasted newsprint helped Picasso to interpose references to tense pre-war politics, to social violence and absurdity and to artistic matters. During two further phases of his development of papier collé in 1913, Picasso discovered that shapes could acquire other meanings or identities simply by their arrangement, without requiring a resemblance to naturalistic appearances. A single shape might wittily and equally convincingly stand for the side of a guitar or a human head. Elements glued on to the surface, or hand-painted imitations of such material in a sophisticated double-take on the relationship between illusion and reality, were incorporated in subsequent paintings such as Geometric Composition: The Guitar (oil on canvas mounted on wood, 870×475 mm, spring 1913; Paris, Mus. Picasso, 38). Each element in the works of this phase, known as Synthetic Cubism, was carefully considered for the ways it could contribute to pictorial meaning.
In the same year that Apollinaire published Les Peintres cubistes: Méditations esthétiques (Paris, 1913), Picasso showed paintings in group exhibitions in Vienna and Prague, at the Armory Show in New York and at the Jack of Diamonds exhibition in Moscow; he also held his first large retrospective, comprising work from 1901 to 1912, at the Galerie Thannhauser in Munich. From mid-March Picasso and Eva Gouel spent five months in Céret, accompanied by Max Jacob and later by Juan Gris, and in August they moved into new quarters in the Rue Schoelcher. Although the designation of two phases of Cubism first made by Kahnweiler in Der Weg zum Kubismus (Munich, 1920), which distinguished between an analytical description of objects and a synthesis of information about an object into a more unified self-sufficient structure, has dated, the terminology remains; however, numerous works of this period resist rigid classification as examples of either Analytical or Synthetic Cubism. Woman in an Armchair (autumn 1913; New York, Mrs Victor Ganz priv. col., see Penrose and Golding, 1973, no. 131), resuming a favourite early theme, includes traces of Analytical Cubist colour and faceting as deliberate signs of other systems of representation within a Synthetic Cubist matrix. By contrast the Card Player (1914; New York, MOMA) appears more ironically detached, but it too rejects a single consistent reading by juxtaposing several kinds of pictorial space and illusionistic conventions.
The Demoiselles, as Picasso’s first major painting to feature stylistic disconnectedness, was followed by papiers collés and Synthetic Cubist paintings that significantly ruptured previous conceptions of style. By such means Picasso discovered that sets of pictorial conventions could be manipulated with the same freedom as individual components. In the unfinished painting The Painter and his Model (oil and pencil on canvas, summer 1914; Paris, Mus. Picasso, 53) and in portrait drawings of 1915, he startlingly made use of naturalistic conventions of drawing, shading and space; nevertheless, concurrent with these critiques of the disintegration of consistency and wholeness in Cubism, he both elaborated the decorative possibilities of Cubism and distilled a more purified austerity. The possible variations made room for humour, irony and high seriousness.




If you would like to have more information about Pablo Picasso time term which I write below in line and to see more paintings about his time period please click to link Moma Museum web page and to reach latest news about Pablo Picasso exhibition at Art Institute Chicago to read click below web page of  mymagicalattic.
I.Life and work
            1.Early years, to 1905
            2.Primitivism and Cubism 1906 – 1915
            3.Variations of style, Classicism and the theatre 1916 – 1924
            4.Interactions with Surrealism 1925 – 1935
            5.War years and later work 1936 – 1973
II.Working methods and technique
            1.Style
            2.Painting
            3.Sculpture
            4.Collages, papiers colles and constructions
            5.Printmaking
            6.Decorative and applied arts
            7.Collaborative work
III.Character and personality
IV.Critical reception and posthumous reputation life
b



SPANISH PAINTER PABLO PICASSO 1881 - 1973