January 04, 2015

FRENCH PAINTER FABIENNE VERDIER




FRENCH PAINTER FABIENNE VERDIER




FRENCH PAINTER FABIENNE VERDIER
POLYPHONY OF GRAVITATION
Doris von Drathen
When a bolt of lightning pierces the heavens, there is no time for words. Afterward we describe its brief flash as a trace, as something that we saw. It is almost impossible to seize hold of the event that is the present moment. It occurs, it ushers itself into existence, but that self has neither existence nor duration. It is the border between being and existence; it is a function.1 Thus the hic et nunc, the endeavor to nonetheless grasp the precise instant of absolute present, remains one of the great, recurring challenges for those artists who, comparable to alchemists, search for the very essence of our existence, seek out that moment when sacred terror renders us speechless. For this sliver of time has the power of opening up a fissure onto an immensity lying beyond the bounds of our everyday life.
This breathtaking event of an absolute present, which rushes with all its power into human awareness, is the incantatory energy that casts its spell on the viewer standing before the paintings of Fabienne Verdier. The viewer sees the traces of the brush occurring here and now, as if the acutely immediate coming-to-existence of these pictorial events were occurring right before his eyes.
The radical statements of the individual brushstroke run like a crevice through the endlessly flowing texture of time and space. This trace of the brush is the central focus in the œuvre of this transgressor of frontiers who, in fact, has created a sculptural painting. The viewer understands intuitively that he is not standing in front of a representational image here, but instead is participating in a painterly event within the dynamic field of the real space in which he himself is situated. Thus the presence of the vehement brushstroke gives rise in the viewer to a heightened sense of “being-in-space.” He becomes instantaneously aware of his own rootedness in the present, his own gravitation and groundedness. It is as if the radical instant of the present were to go hand in hand with the precision of that inalienable, indivisible point that connects us to the very core of the earth.
The brushstrokes can take on the forms in which the universe moves. They can cut through the space as axial planetary paths, can flow in meandering currents or ramify into arboreal structures, can rear up wildly and break away in vigorous sweeps; they can pull away in the vast zigzags of beating wings or mountain ranges, can conglomerate into heavy, rocklike masses—nevertheless these abstract forms, which do not strive for a geometry of appearances but instead for an embodiment of space and its energies, always arise from one broad painterly stroke, from a single movement of the large Chinese brush that, after a period of pause and concentration, rushes with emphatic finality through the space of the canvas.
Like the striking of a gong, which we not only perceive acoustically but also feel with the resonance of our body, so do we experience this pictorial event not only in visual terms, but also through the much more highly differentiated sensorium of corporeal perception. Only a physical being-in-space, receptive to the entire spectrum of sensory impressions, can usher into experience the actual dimension of this painterly occurrence, namely the event of a brushstroke that embodies an energy flow in the space that we share with it. Whoever becomes open to this nonrational sensory perception will be able to feel the forces of gravitation, of adhesion or cohesion, of magnetism; the power of the breath and of flowing emptiness; the energies of sound and of color. For these are the painterly materials of this abstraction, which cannot be classified according to any customary aesthetic categories. The more deeply the viewer comes to resonate with these pictorial spaces and their movement, the more his perception casts off the overlying rhythms of everyday life, and the more the
dynamically charged energy field of these spaces transfers itself onto his consciousness and gradually transforms it with new energies.
Perspective does not exist—like the horizon, or like the axial intersection of horizontality and verticality, it numbers among the visual habits to which we are so accustomed that, against our better judgment, we perceive them as given realities. Space knows nothing of our inventions, which serve to reduce its unfathomable immensity. One of these perceptions—disregarding the actual knowledge of physics—is the idea that the life-space through which we move is static. At the same time, we adhere to the age-old conviction that its appearances are bound to the present instant, that space is “actually” nothing other than a stream of permanently
self-renewing impulses, in other words “occurrences in time.” Max Raphael designates the interplay of elements that come to appearance in space and through space, and which establish their energy-dialogue in the permanent weaving of a magnetic interdependence, as a “time of dynamic action.”2
 This is the power of spatial impact, which we sense in the brushstrokes of Fabienne Verdier. What we experience is our own unmistakable connection to the forces at the core of the earth. What we sense is the manifestation of energies that are alive in
space and that influence our life.
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MARGARETE, LA PENSEE LABYRINTHIQUE II - 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 180 × 356 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






MARGARETA I , 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 180 × 403 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






LA FAILLE 2014
Installation of a Monumental Painting in Majunga Tower, La Défense
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 12 × 8 m
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






LA FAILLE 2014 ( DETAIL )






LA FAILLE 2014 ( DETAIL )






PAYSAGE DE FLUX 2007
Polyptyque Horizontal en Résonance Avec Willem de Kooning
Dimensions: 183 × 610 cm
Collection Foundation H. Looser, Zurich






ARCHIPEL 1 - 2005
Serigraphy Printed in 8 Colours
Dimensions: 110 × 75 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier





COLOR FLOWS 6 - 2012
Mixed Media on Canvas
Dimensions: 60 × 140 cm
Courtesy of Art Plural Gallery, Singapore
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier
 



LIGNE ESPACE – TEMPS N° 04, 2009
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 352 × 320 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






LIGNE ESPACE – TEMPS N° 1 - 2008
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 256 × 300 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




DETACHEMENT INTERIEUR 2000
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 70 × 80 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




REFLETS DE L’EAU N° 1, 2011
Ink on China Paper
Dimensions: 81 × 34 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier














NUAGES N° 3, 2011
Ink on China Paper
Dimensions: 35 × 78 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




PEINTURE DU 03 N0VEMBRE 2008, 2008
Hommage au Diptyque du Calvaire de Rogier Van der Weyden
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 253 × 100 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




MUTATIONS ET TRANSFORMATIONS 2000




ETUDE II MARGARETA 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 85 × 111 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier








1. THE STUDIO AS TOOL
The brushstrokes of Fabienne Verdier are something like corporeal witnesses for that singular instant of a harmonious encounter between the dynamism of color-material in space and the artist’s bodily awareness of the present, that instant when, in the deepest concentration of this awareness—in a radical and exclusive here-and-now—she enters into dialogue with this dynamism and thereby opens the dialogue to the viewer.
Her studio is built above a spring. A site is thereby created where telluric energies are particularly perceptible. The canvasses are spread out on the floor. For Fabienne Verdier, the painterly grounding onto which she steps is space itself.
Mounted onto an iron beam that traverses the twelve-meter-high studio are Chinese brushes, huge and ancient. Some of their shafts are as tall as the painter herself; their bundled hairs can absorb so large an amount of paint that the weight has to be counterbalanced by their being hung up. The large brushes are suspended close together from the ceiling. When disburdened of paint, they begin to sway softly in a pendular dance of telluric energies; they seem to be alive and to resemble a convocation of strange beings.
Ever since Fabienne Verdier returned to Paris at the beginning of the nineties after ten years of study in China, she has constantly reinvented her tools in order to adapt them to her pictorial ideas. In this highly individual empiricism, the artist Fabienne Verdier developed an abstraction of painting that cannot be assigned to any category. The most important tool for her work is in fact the site of her studio. In this energetically charged stillness, which made itself felt in an immediate manner when I stood within this space for the first time, the painterly process develops as an actual dialogue between the paint material and the forces of gravitation, the dynamics of adhesion and cohesion, the electric energies of magnetism, the movements of the earth’s rotation—in other words, it is a dialogue that arises each day out of completely different circumstances according to temperature and weather, the position of the sun and the moon, and the constellation of other planetary orbits. For the paint reacts to heat, for instance, with extreme agitation, causing the edges to spray upward and fray; in the case of cold, it is lethargic, adhering more strongly to the canvas. The entire painterly act in the dialogue between the artist and the brush, the pictorial space, and the nascent form will be defined by the consistency of the paint material in response to the meteorological conditions of the particular day.
If one of the large brushes is soaked with the weight of the mass of ink, it develops in the sweep of its pendular movement such a force that this dialogue becomes an extreme physical challenge for the artist. The more recent, large formats of the canvasses gave rise to a problem that at first seemed insurmountable. How was it possible, while retaining the highly concentrated vehemence of the painterly gesture, which is one of the principles of Fabienne Verdier’s painting, to work in what were now much longer transits without setting down the brush and reentering the room with a refilled container of painting material? The maximum ink reservoir of the largest brushes, which bind together thirty-five horse’s tails, became the prerequisite. Its being attached to a cable, however, did not in itself sufficiently reduce the weight of this giant among the Chinese brushes.
The artist violated the great taboo of Chinese art: She cut off the shaft of the giant brush and had a sort of bicycle handlebar mounted onto the wooden ferrule of the brush, which was now hung directly from long, flexible cables. This technical achievement opened up new horizons. The new mobility now allowed the artist to move through the space of a large canvas with the same speed that she previously
moved through the space of the smaller formats for which, logically, lighter brushes are required. This sacrilege is scarcely comprehensible to an outsider. In spite of such liberation, it is still important for the artist, who in the eighties studied and lived in China for ten years, to point out that, even though externally she has severed the axis of the brush, in no way has she inwardly abandoned the awareness of herself as being the axis between heaven and earth, for this teaching long ago became her ethical foundation and center, her discipline and attitude toward the act of living.3
By her own logic, she has remained true to the Chinese tradition.
This is demonstrated throughout her entire œuvre, the center of which, or one should actually say heart muscle, is the “single stroke of the brush.” Lying concealed here is one of the oldest concepts of Chinese philosophy, namely the wisdom, attainable only with difficulty, of transposing a mental or an observed complexity in a single brushstroke. This was the high art of the venerable masters with whom Fabienne Verdier studied. This was the reason she stayed for so long in China. Her abstract painting that we have before us today is accordingly no reduction but, quite the converse, a compression of all the aspects of an appearance into the very essence of its existence.
This search also constitutes in its unfolding logic the core of this text. Although the œuvre of Fabienne Verdier, through her early years of training, is marked by Chinese philosophy, I will approach this universe with great freedom from a Western perspective and simply refer here and there to concepts from Chinese thought, above all when striking analogies emerge between the two worlds. Out of a concern, however, to avoid reducing the immense knowledge lying behind every one of these Chinese concepts, I will limit myself to allowing the individual ideas to merely be hinted at, here and there, in order to indicate their vast dimensions. What is more important to me is to demonstrate that it is possible to approach the œuvre of Fabienne Verdier through Western thought, for that is where the universality of this abstraction is revealed.
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FABIENNE VERDIER'S STUDIO


















FABIENNE VERDIER NOTEBOOK










FABIENNE VERDIER NOTEBOOK














FABIENNE VERDIER'S STUDIO








2. PAINTING AS A MANIFESTATION OF SPACE
All works are preceded by a long mental process and weeks of reflection; a pictorial concept emerges through hundreds of drawings. Even if the material and the movement in space are important elements in this dialogic painting process, the artist decides about pictorial structure and form. But Fabienne Verdier considers her “will to create art” (Kunstwollen)4 not as a subjection of the material and its dynamism, but as her individual artistic discipline of accomplishing an act of painting
in harmonic unison with spatial forces. In the preparatory phase, her will to create art is directed more toward working on the equilibrium of her awareness. For this reason, one could in fact speak of a sort of polyphony that ultimately arises between diverse but reciprocally resonant elements—the artistic activity, the material, and the space as components of a time of dynamic action.
The painting that we have before us does not signify, does not make reference to anything, but instead is a real event in space. The painted traces that we see do not appear because of their form, but instead are real manifestations of spatial energy. And it is precisely here that the œuvre of Fabienne Verdier differentiates itself from the customary categories of abstract painting. The event of these brushstrokes penetrates the consciousness of the viewer like a sonic depth finder. We physically
feel our own groundedness, feel our presentness, our hic et nunc in the flowing, actional texture of space and time.
What we experience is more of a physical-sculptural event. This perspective becomes quite evident when, in spite of the formal differences, one considers for the sake of comparison a small work by Joseph Beuys that, at the beginning of the sixties, he called an Erdding (Earth-Thing).5 This was a wooden construction that he had retained when hammering apart the plaster covering of a Kreuzigung (Crucifixion)
[figs. 2 and 3], an old work from his student days. The title remained as well. Beuys simply attached a thin, tangled wire to the tip of the small, skeleton-like framework. To the wire he tied a thread from which a needle swung freely in space. While the viewer enters into sympathetic contact with this fragile pendulum, he senses deep within himself his own relationship to the magnetism of the earth’s core as indicated by the tiny needle. In its radical reality as a system of physical forces, this “Earth Thing” of Beuys can convey far more about Fabienne Verdier’s painting than any comparison with other abstract painting. For the experience that as individuals we are oriented toward—an innate, indivisible, inalienable gravitation point—is precisely the liberating power that the viewer senses in the paintings of Fabienne Verdier. To experience oneself with reality firmly underfoot, to sense one’s own groundedness, to feel oneself as an independent individual, is to above all and in essence to comprehend one’s autonomous position, one’s autonomous speech and action in this world.
The fascinating spell and deep mystery of this painting cannot be experienced in purely visual terms. A purely rational and intellectual approach would contradict the empirical logic inherent to the œuvre of this artist. Moreover, one of the egregious misconceptions of our era is the belief that visual perception is less physical than all the other senses we use to comprehend the world. The senses are not exclusive; they act in concert.6 The visual faculty is embedded in the totality of our sensory perception. Sound influences our experience of space. Smells can summon up images of remembrance. Looking at pictures can change our mood. Just as we experience the spatiality of our environment with our entire physical existence, so does the viewer likewise discover the actual dimensions of the visual world of Fabienne Verdier through the complex apparatus of a comprehensive sensory perception. After Kant 7
 and Hegel,8 who were the first to attempt to overcome the old Aristotelian gap between the senses and the mind, and who refuted Descartes’ ideas of contrasting
corporeality and mentality, there is no one more radical than Feuerbach in the formulation of this notion of a reevaluation of physical perceptions when he states: “The secret of direct knowledge is sensory awareness.”9 Elsewhere he insistently emphasizes: “[…] the mental is nothing without the sensory.”10 He thereby sets up an equation between the sensory and the mental that he characterizes as “essence, as the mind of the senses.”11 This reevaluation finds an echo in contemporary French philosophy with the great concept of the sensible, which Emmanuel Levinas primarily
developed and Jacques Rancière12 elaborated further. For Levinas, however, the concept of the sensible was the point of departure for his philosophy of an ethically based ontology. For it was precisely in sensory cognition, which is able much more than rational cognition to transcend simple experience and to attain a mental-sensory horizon of experience, that Levinas saw the prerequisite for encountering the Other beyond one’s own conceptual borders.13
But indeed, this is what constitutes the very essence of a work of art—the fact that it is an ontological event that confronts us with the Other. Aby Warburg even speaks of two energetically charged poles—that of the work of art, and that of the viewer. It is between them, in the electrically charged, magnetic field of their energies that the work of art first comes to being—not as an object, but in fact as an ignition, as something unseizable, as a flame.14 Only after this sensory, emotional event can the
logos arise, can a commentary begin. Not all artists are capable of creating presences that induce, shock, and trigger such a comprehensively evocative experience. Fabienne Verdier is one of these select few artists.
One of the exceptional aspects of Fabienne Verdier’s painting is the fact that she does not align her work with an aesthetic discourse but instead speaks about her œuvre within the terminology of astrophysics. Verdier has a self-evident awareness of being part of the cosmos, of being made of matter. In actuality, her painterly dialogue means breaking the age-old monopoly of the human being’s claim to be the sole artist; instead it recognizes nature as an artistic partner. For her, the dialogic painting
process means living in distinct awareness of a correspondence with the universe. The artist conceives of herself as a being who is connected at every moment with the evolutionary process of the cosmos and who, just like matter, resonates with the movements of the earth and the lunar cycles. The painter sees herself as part of the constant ebb and flow, the ceaseless transformation of matter.
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PEINTURE DU 2 SEPTEMBRE 2014
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 150 × 365 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




SERIE WALKING – PAINTING, SOLO N° 04, 2013
Ink on Paper "Moulin du Gué"
Dimensions: 198 × 134 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier
 



SERIE WALKING – PAINTING, QUADRIPTYQUE N° 01, 2013
Ink on Paper "Moulin du Gué"
Dimensions: 198 × 536 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






SERIE WALKING – PAINTING, TRIPTYQUE N° 05, 2013
Ink on Paper "Moulin du Gué"
Dimensions: 198 × 402 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






SERIE WALKING – PAINTING, TRIPTYQUE N° 07, 2013
Ink on Paper "Moulin du Gué"
Dimensions: 198 × 402 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




SERIE WALKING – PAINTING, SOLO N° 02, 2013
Ink on Paper "Moulin du Gué"
Dimensions: 198 × 134 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier
 





POLYPHONIE, ASCESE, 2013
Les Vitraux de "La Vierge au Chanoine Van der Paele"
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 7,35 × 4,07 m
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






POLYPHONIE, ASCESE, INSTALLATION IN MEMLING MUSEUM 2013
Les Vitraux de "La Vierge au Chanoine Van der Paele"
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 7,35 × 4,07 m
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






POLYPHONIE 2011
Les Vitraux de "La Vierge au Chanoine Van der Paele"
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 183 × 408 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






FENETRE SUR L’INFINI N° 2, 2012
Oil Pastel on Dyed Arches Vellum
Dimensions: 54 × 38 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




FENETRE SUR L’INFINI N° 3, 2012
Oil Pastel on Dyed Arches Vellum
Dimensions: 54 × 38 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier








FRESQUE TORLONIA, OPUS I - 2010
Installation of Two Frescos in The Palazzo Torlonia, Rome
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 407 × 763 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






FRESQUE TORLONIA, OPUS II - 2010
Installation of Two Frescos in The Palazzo Torlonia, Rome
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 407 × 757 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




L’HOMME EN PRIERE I - 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 181 × 121 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier 






L’HOMME EN PRIERE II - 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 181 × 121 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




INTENTION III ANDANTE - 2004
Pigments and Ink on Canvas in Linen - Cotton
Dimensions: 136 × 160 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




BLACK CIRCLE 2006
Serigraphy Printed in 8 Colours
Dimensions: 111 × 76 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




PELERINAGE AUX MONTS DES INTENTIONS 2006
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 135 ×160 cm
Musée National d’art Moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier
 





BRANCHE D’EVEIL 2004
Série : "Essence Végétale"
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 109 × 46 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






CHARPENTE D’ARBRE 2004
Série : "Essence Végétale"
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 45 × 40 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




MATURARE N°16, 2009
Ink on Chinapaper
Dimensions: 42 × 56 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




SAINT CHRISTOPHE TRAVERSANT LES EAUX I - 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 244 × 135 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




SAINT CHRISTOPHE TRAVERSANT LES EAUX III - 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 180 × 365 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier






ETUDE II MARGARETA 2011
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 85 × 111 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




MELODIE DU REEL I - 2014
Ink, Pigments and Varnish on Canvas
Dimensions: 183 × 135 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




BRANCHES ER BOURGEONS ‘’ETUDEDUVEGETAL‘’ - 2010
Serigraphy Printed in 9 Colours
Dimensions: 150 × 124 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




LE MONT DES IMMORTELS 1993
Cobalt Ink and Cinnabar Seals on Silk Canvas
Dimensions: 38 × 25 cm
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier




MEDITATIONS EN COBALT 1997
Homage to Variations Without a Theme of Yehudi Menhuin
Cobalt Ink, Pigments, Varnish and Cinnabar Seals on Silk Canvas
Dimensions: 180 × 260 cm
Musée Cernuschi Collection, Paris
© 2014 Fabienne Verdier
















FABIENNE VERDIER
by Doris von Drathen
Fabienne Verdier is a border-crosser between several worlds:
Chinese old masters and painters of the Italian and Northern Renaissance; at the same time however she emphasizes a radical pragmatism which, shows similarities to the twenty years older Post-Minimalist generation.
Born in 1962, the artist is one of the youngest abstract painters working today. Inasmuch as she has created a sculptural mode of painting, it is nearly impossible to compare her oeuvre with that of other painters. But one could say that Fabienne
Verdier’s attitude basing her life on Asian discipline inscribes her in the field of thinking and painting of the American artists Agnes Martin and Pat Steir.
Although Fabienne Verdier studied painting and philosophy in China for ten years, she developed her own, radically new abstraction. Her painting does not represent anything, but instead creates a manifestation of telluric forces. With the method of the single brushstroke which is the center of her work, she searches for more than abstraction, seeks out the essence of all things. In this same logic, the space of the canvas does not represent a pictorial space, but is real space, influenced by the same cosmic forces as is our own vital space.
Thus the painting with which she achieved her breakthrough in the international art world is titled L´Un (“The One,” 2007). In fact, this title alludes to nothing else than the uniqueness of that brushstroke which, in its deepest enigma, is similar to the enigma of the essence of all things. This painting was placed next to works by Rothko, Pollock, and Richter during the exhibition Art of Deceleration at the Museum Wolfsburg in Germany.
A crucial painting in that same year of 2007 was Cercle Blanc (“White Circle”), which showed the importance of the void and the energies of breathing: those of the painter herself during her act of painting, and those of space, which she transverses with the brush. Evidence is provided here that Fabienne Verdier transforms the material into a support of the void.
A series of paintings were the turning point in Fabienne Verdier’s oeuvre: Ligne Espace-Temps  Line through Time- Space (2009). These were paintings which, for the first time, made it necessary to traverse huge spaces with one “tank” of ink, without interrupting the line. With the radical pragmatism of these new conditions, Fabienne Verdier cut the handle of one of her biggest brushes composed of 35 horse tails and had it mounted under the ceiling of her 12 meter high studio. To break this taboo and severe that handle, as tall as herself, was her definitive liberation from the Chinese tradition, even though she states that the vertical axis and its philosophical
discipline will always be alive in her mind and body.
This was the basis for giving birth to a new dimension of painting. Celebrated in Italy in 2010 were two walls of “frescoes” in the Palazzo Torlonia in Rome: Two polyptychs each 4 m in height and 7m50cm in length had been created with this newly mounted brush, which offered much more mobility “in space.” Another polyptych of 2m50cm x 6m33cm was dedicated to the drama of the tsunami and in fact showed our
helplessness in facing the forces of nature.
This radical work of a condensed complexity―which could be a thought, an observation of nature, a piece of music, or a drama of humanity―found its limit in confronting the highly detailed paintings of the northern Renaissance at the museum
of Bruges, where Fabienne Verdier will exhibit a dialogue with her paintings in March 2013. Sometimes a detail like tiny, leadframed windows could inspire the artist to amazing polyptychs of huge dimensions: Polyphonie is one of them which gave rise
to a new mode of thought, transforming the void, the breathing into the energy of voice.
All the paintings of Fabienne Verdier have this in common: Even though they might appear to be spontaneous gestures, the act of painting is very slow and highly premeditated, prepared by hundreds of elaborate drawings and by a reflection mirrored in series of notebooks. And they all have this in common: Being a manifestation of telluric forces, they―in spite of their abstraction―are a cosmic reality of their own, an absolute presence which awakens in us the consciousness of our own presence in space.
www.fabienneverdier.com