August 01, 2013

HENRY MOORE EXHIBITION AT RIJKSMUSEUM GARDEN




HENRY MOORE EXHIBITION AT RIJKSMUSEUM GARDEN
June 22, 2013 – September 29, 2013




HENRY MOORE EXHIBITION AT RIJKSMUSEUM GARDEN
June 22, 2013 – September 29, 2013
An exhibition of important monumental works by Henry Moore has opened the Rijksmuseum’s new gardens on 22 June 2013. The exhibition, which includes twelve sculptures, many of which will be seen in the Netherlands for the first time, has been arranged in collaboration with the Henry Moore Foundation.
Highlights of the exhibition include Reclining Woman: Elbow 1981, which has not left the façade of the Leeds Art Gallery since its creation over 30 years ago; Large Two Forms 1966, with open monumental shapes that can be physically entered and provide shifting views of the gardens and architecture of the Rijksmuseum; and Large Reclining Figure 1984, a work Moore enlarged to over 9 meters from a 1938 Surrealist maquette only 33cm long. Of particular interest is Locking Piece 1963-64, in white fibreglass made by Moore to offer a variation to the darker bronze which can also be seen in the Netherlands at the Hague.
It was particularly in the post-war years that Henry Moore (1898-1986) won international acclaim for his semi-abstract sculptures, often inspired by natural, organic forms. The reclining figure also represents a central theme in the sculptor’s work. The twelve works in the exhibition, in both bronze and fibreglass, explore both these aspects of Moore's oeuvre. The siting of the sculptures is spectacular, set against the 19th century façade of the museum building.
The exhibition is the first in a series of annual international sculpture displays which will be presented in the Rijksmuseum’s gardens over the next five years, made possible with funding from the BankGiro Lottery and an anonymous donor.
The exhibition marks the opening of the Rijksmuseum's new 'outdoor gallery' comprising an area of 14,500m2. Copijn Tuin- en Landschapsarchitecten took architect Pierre Cuypers' original plan for the gardens of 1901 as their starting point for the new design. The gardens include many original features including sculptures, ponds and lawns to which a number of new elements have been added.

https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/whats-on/henry-moore-exhibition-to-celebrate-opening-of-rijksmuseum-gardens




LARGE RECLINING FIGURE , 1984
Fibreglass
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




LARGE RECLINING FIGURE (DETAIL) , 1984




LARGE RECLINING FIGURE (DETAIL) , 1984




LARGE RECLINING FIGURE , 1984
Fibreglass
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




RECLINING FIGURE , 1974






RECLINING FIGURE IV, 1972




RECLINING FIGURE: HAND, 1979
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation


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RECLINING FIGURE: HAND, 1979
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




RECLINING FIGURE, 1967




SIX RECLINING FIGURES, 1973





FOUR RECLINING FIGURES, 1973




LOCKING PIECE, 1963 - 1965
Fiberglass
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




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DRAPED RECLINING FIGURE, 1952 - 1953
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation








GROUP OF RECLINING FIGURES, 1973






OVAL WITH POINTS, 1968 - 1970
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation






OVAL WITH POINTS, 1968 - 1970
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




SILHOUTTE FIGURES WITH BORDER DESIGN 1973 










FOUR RECLINING FIGURES, 1973




LARGE TWO FORMS, 1966
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation








TWO FORMS, 1967




LARGE TWO FORMS, 1966
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




LOCKING PIECE, 1963 - 1964
Fiberglass
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation






THREE RECLINING FIGURES, 1971




THREE IDEAS FOR SCULPTURE, 1981






RECLINING FIGURE: ARCH LEG, 1969 - 1970
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation


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RECLINING FIGURE: ARCH LEG, 1969 - 1970
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation






RECLINING WOMAN: ELBOW, 1981
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation


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TWO RECLINING FIGURES, 1973










TWO PIECE RECLINING FIGURES POINT, 1969
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




LARGE STANDING FIGURE: KNIFE EDGE, 1961
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation








EIGHT RECLINING FIGURES, 1958






KNIFE EDGE TWO PIECES 1962 - 1965
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation


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KNIFE EDGE TWO PIECES 1962 - 1965
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation




THREE RECLINING FIGURES, 1971






RECLINING FIGURE, 1975




TWO PIECE RECLINING FIGURE: CUT, 1979 - 1981
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation








TWO PIECE RECLINING FIGURE: CUT, 1979 - 1981
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation


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TWO PIECE RECLINING FIGURE NO:2, 1960
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation






TWO PIECE RECLINING FIGURE NO:2, 1960
Brons
Foto: John Lewis Marshall
Permission by the Henry Moore Foundation








HENRY MOORE 1898 - 1986
Henry Moore, the seventh of eight children of Raymond Spencer Moore and his wife Mary, was born in the small coalmining town of Castleford, Yorkshire, on 30 July 1898. Moore attended infant and elementary schools in his hometown, and entered Castleford Secondary School via a scholarship when he was eleven years old.
He was determined to sit the examinations for a scholarship to the local art college, but his father, ever a practical man, thought that he should follow an elder sister into the teaching profession.  After a brief introduction as a student teacher, Moore began teaching full-time at his old school in Castleford.
He enlisted at the age of eighteen and presently joined the 15th Battalion The London Regiment, known as the Civil Service Rifles.  Shortly afterwards he was sent to France, where he and his regiment took part in the battle of Cambrai.  Moore's active participation in the war ceased when he was gassed; he was sent back to spend two months in hospital.
Moore went back to his teaching post in Castleford, but he now knew that teaching in school was not for him.  He applied for and received an ex-serviceman's grant to attend Leeds School of Art.  At the end of his second year he won a scholarship to the Royal College of Art in London.
In 1924 Moore was appointed as sculpture instructor at the Royal College.  It was there that he met Irina Radetsky, a painting student at the college, whom he married a year later.  The couple lived in Hampstead, where they mingled with many aspiring young artists and writers, including Ben Nicholson, Barbara Hepworth, Stephen Spender and Herbert Read.
Moore now became involved in the art life of London.  His first commission, received in 1928, was to produce a sculpture relief for the newly opened Headquarters of London Transport at St James's Underground building.  His first one-man exhibition, which consisted of forty-two sculptures and fifty-one drawings, opened at the Warren Gallery in 1928.
In the 1930s came three more one-man shows, all at the Leicester Galleries.  Moore also participated in major group exhibitions of the time.  In 1931 he exhibited three works in the Plastik exhibition in Zurich.  In 1936 Moore signed the manifesto urging the end of a policy of non-intervention in Spain.  He attempted to go to Republican Spain as part of a delegation of English artists and writers, but their request for permission to travel was rejected by the British Government.  In 1940 their Hampstead home was damaged by a nearby bomb, and the Moores rented a house in Perry Green, a small hamlet in Hertfordshire, forty kilometres north of London.  Here the artist would remain for the rest of his life.
In the early 1940s he had begun to make drawings of people sheltering from air-raids in the London Underground.  These drawings, together with those he made subsequently in the coalmines, are considered among his greatest achievements.
His daughter Mary was born in 1946, the year of his first foreign retrospective exhibition, at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Demands for exhibitions of his work began to increase, both in number and in scale.  In 1972 came the Florence exhibition, the largest and most impressive to that date.  A gift of over two hundred sculptures and drawings and a complete collection of graphics was made to the Art Gallery of Ontario in 1974.  Over thirty major pieces and another collection of graphics went to The Tate Gallery in 1978.  Other gifts have included drawings to the British Museum and graphic work to the Victoria and Albert Museum and the British Council in London.
A few years before his death in 1986 Moore gave the whole estate at Perry Green with its studios, houses, cottages and collection of work to the Trustees of the Henry Moore Foundation to administer in perpetuity, charging them with the allocation of grants, bursaries and scholarships to promote sculpture within the cultural life of the country.
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You may reach more information about Henry Moore to click below Henry Moore Foundation’s  page.
http://www.henry-moore.org/pg/henry-moore-online-resources/a-more-detailed-account-of-moores-life-and-work






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HENRY MOORE’S LIFE 1926 - 1935
Moore’s sculptures in the twenties and the early thirties are perfect examples of deeply romantic English lyricism with a great feeling for landscape and natural forms. Whilst his early work remained firmly grounded in relatively figurative forms, Moore also rejected tradition, choosing for his inspiration not the classical figures of the Renaissance and the Graeco-Roman tradition but primitive models, as seen in the British Museum and the readily available information on non-western art that was fashionable at the time. One of Moore’s first sculptures to demonstrate his distinctive individual style was the 1929 Reclining Figure in brown Horton stone (LH 59), later sold to the Leeds City Art Gallery. 
Moore also rejected the established academic practices and insisted on direct carvings and truth to materials, influenced by sculptors like Brancusi and Epstein. His early sculpture was not always understood or appreciated, and revolutionary as it was, it was largely condemned by reviewers. Often his works were expressed in Epsteinian terms of primitivism and barbarism, in the Daily Mirror (14 April 1931) the Leeds Reclining Figure is described: A monstrosity at an exhibition of sculpture by Mr. Henry Moore which surpassed in repulsiveness even that of Epstein.
The year 1928 marks a major turning point in Moore’s career, his remarkable talent was finally being recognized and he received his first public commission to produce a relief for Charles Holden’s new London Transport headquarters above St James’s Park Underground Station. With the West Wind Relief in Portland stone (LH 58), his first effort to make public art, Moore was finally able to conceive his developing ideas on a monumental scale. In the same year Moore had his first one-man exhibition in the Warren Gallery in London, and it was followed by a second show at the Leicester Galleries in 1931. From the 1931 exhibition came the first sale to a gallery abroad, and in the same year he exhibited three works in the Plastik exhibition in Zurich.
 
Before Moore had left for his trip to Italy he had accepted a seven-year appointment as a sculpture instructor at the RCA, a post which in return for two days’ teaching a week gave him enough to live on and develop his own work. It was there that he met Irina Radetsky, a painting student at the college, whom he married in 1929. The couple lived in Hampstead and became friends with many aspiring young artists and writers, including Barbara Hepworth, Ben Nicholson, Naum Gabo and Herbert Read. Moore moved from the RCA in 1932 and began teaching as a first head of the department of sculpture at the Chelsea School of Art.
 
Between 1930-1935 Moore was elected to the 7 and 5 Society, a society that originally consisted of seven painters and five sculptors. By 1934 the society’s general meeting was attended by Moore, Hepworth, Nicholson, Piper, amongst others, and the- new name 7 & 5 abstract group was proposed. Moore exhibited in the last exhibition of the 7 & 5 at Zwemmer Gallery in 1935. In 1933 Paul Nash founded Unit One, which again included Moore. Also that year a book Unit One - the modern movement in English architecture, painting and sculpture, edited by Herbert Read was published. In 1934 Moore contributed to the Unit One exhibition at the Mayor Gallery in London. Moore was becoming an established name and as early as 1934 there was the first monograph on Moore’s work by Herbert Read, published by Zwemmer, London.
In 1934 he and Irina made their only visit to Spain, visiting Altamira, Madrid, Toledo and Barcelona. Moore paid close attention to the caves of Altamira, the El Grecos in Toledo, the Prado in Madrid and the Museo Episcopal at Vic with its fourteenth-century paintings and sculptures. He was much affected by the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in the country that he had so recently visited. Throughout Moore's life, and in spite of his considerable wealth in later years, he remained faithful to his father's 'old Labour' left-wing politics, hence his sympathies were unequivocally on the Republican side.
http://www.henry-moore.org/pg/research/henry-moores-life/1926--1935








HENRY MOORE’S LIFE 1936 - 1945
n 1936, Alfred Barr, then the director of the Museum of Modern art in New York, borrowed Moore's Two Forms 1934 in Pynkado wood (LH 153), for his Cubism and Abstract Art Exhibition. Barr later purchased the work, making it the first Moore sculpture in an American public collection. Moore had been a regular visitor to Paris almost every year from the early 1920s, but from 1930 onwards he went more frequently and was directly influenced by the vanguard in Paris, most notably Picasso, Arp and Giacometti. His fruitful contacts with these artists found their logical conclusion in his work.
In 1937 he became a member of the English Surrealist group. In 1938 he took part in the International Exhibition of Abstract Art at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Moore's one-man shows, and his contributions to several of the major group exhibitions and major international exhibitions in the 1930s helped to confirm his growing reputation. Not all the response was favourable: the art critic of the London Morning Post (11 April 1931) led the opposition with: The cult of ugliness triumphs at the hands of Mr. Moore. He shows an utter contempt for the natural beauty of women and children, and in doing so, deprives even stone of its value as a means of aesthetic and emotional expression.
In 1936 Moore signed the manifesto urging the end of a policy of non-intervention in Spain. He attempted to go to Republican Spain as part of a delegation of English artists and writers including Auden and Spender, but their request for permission to travel was rejected by the British Government. 
In 1939, when war broke out, the Moore's were staying in their cottage at Kingston in Kent. They had been spending a lot of their time here, but decided to return to London. Moore's teaching at Chelsea School of Art came to an end when the college was evacuated to Northampton, and Moore resigned his post. The outbreak of war disrupted the inventive continuity of this supremely productive period. 
The Blitz also had a direct impact on the Moores when their Hampstead home was damaged by a nearby bomb in October 1940 and they decided to move out of London, renting half of an old farmhouse named Hoglands in the small hamlet of Perry Green in Hertfordshire, forty kilometres north of the capital. In 1941 the owner of the building, who occupied the other half, decided to sell, and the unexpected arrival of a cheque for £300 from Gordon Onslow-Ford for the Elmwood Reclining Figure 1939 (LH 210) - enabled the couple to buy the whole building.
By the 1940s Moore’s international reputation had began to flourish: the years of the Second World War gave Moore’s status at home a much broader base and also helped establish his name among American collectors. Ironically, the recognition he deserved came not for his sculpture but his Shelter Drawings that depicted the British huddled in the London underground for protection against the aerial bombings of the Blitz. Now the public at large became aware of his work, and he won for the first time a positive and sympathetic response to his work. The agent of this change was the War Artists’ Advisory Committee, and particularly its chairman, the then director of the National Gallery, Sir Kenneth Clark, who appointed Moore an Official War Artist in 1941. These drawings, together with those he made subsequently in the coalmines of Yorkshire, are considered among his greatest achievements.
The 1940s were an eventful decade; Moore’s first retrospective exhibition was held at Temple Newsam, Leeds in 1941, with Graham Sutherland and John Piper. In between repairing Hoglands and working on his Shelter drawings, Moore still found time to sculpt. In 1943 Canon Walter Hussey, an Anglican Clergyman with a remarkably modern taste for contemporary art, asked Moore for a Madonna and Child 1944 in Horton stone (LH 226) for his church, St Matthew’s in Northampton. Hussey wanted to place a strong painting on the wall opposite the Madonna and Child. 
Moore recommended that Sutherland was the most suitable for the commission and his anguished Crucifixion was indeed the perfect complement. Stylistically the Northampton Madonna linked Moore’s past and future. The theme of mother and child went back to his beginnings as a direct carver, and a primitive influence is still there, but there is more warmth and humanity triggered by the birth of his daughter and the experience of the Shelter drawings, also the long suppressed admiration felt for Giotto, Masaccio, Titian, El Greco, and others on his trips to Italy, Paris and Spain had finally been allowed to find its way into his work. 
Now the critical abuse that Moore had received in the thirties turned into praise in the late forties, fifties and sixties. Honours, honorary degrees, prizes, commissions and awards were showered upon him. In 1942 Moore was appointed to the Art Panel of the Council for the Encouragement of Music and the Arts (later the Art Council of Great Britain). In 1943 he had his first one-man exhibition abroad, at Buchholz Gallery, New York. In 1945 came his first honorary doctorate, from the University of Leeds.
You may read Henry Moore’s whole biography from Henry Moore Fondation web page to click above link.