September 02, 2013

LE CORBUSIER: AN ATLAS OF MODERN LANDSCAPES AT MOMA




LE CORBUSIER: AN ATLAS OF MODERN LANDSCAPES SPANS THE ENTIRE
RANGE OF LE CORBUSIER’S ARTISTIC OUTPUT AT MUSEUM OF MODERN ART
June 15, 2013 - September 23, 2013




LE CORBUSIER: AN ATLAS OF MODERN LANDSCAPES SPANS THE ENTIRE
RANGE OF LE CORBUSIER’S ARTISTIC OUTPUT AT MUSEUM OF MODERN ART
June 15, 2013 - September 23, 2013
Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes, the largest exhibition ever produced in New York of the protean and influential oeuvre of Le Corbusier (Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, French, b. Switzerland, 1887–1965), encompasses his work as an architect, interior designer, artist, city planner, writer, and photographer, and is on view from June 15 through September 23, 2013. This major exhibition draws on MoMA’s own collection, and extensively on exclusive loans from the Paris-based Le Corbusier Foundation. Following a path from his youth in the Swiss Jura mountains to his death on the shores of the French Riviera, the exhibition focuses on four types of landscapes, observed or conceived at different scales, and documented in all the genres. Le Corbusier pursued during six decades: the landscape of found objects; the domestic landscape; the architectural landscape of the modern city; and the vast territories he planned. MoMA is the only U.S. venue for the exhibition, which will travel to Fundació " la Caixa " in Barcelona (January 28–May 11, 2014), and to Fundació " la Caixa " in Madrid ( June 11–October 13, 2014 ). It is organized by guest curator Jean-Louis Cohen, Sheldon H. Solow     Professor in the History of Architecture, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University, with Barry Bergdoll, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design at MoMA.
Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes reveals the ways in which Le Corbusier
observed and imagined landscapes throughout his career, using all the artistic mediums and techniques at his disposal, from early watercolors of Italy, Greece, and Turkey, to sketches of India, and from photographs of his formative journeys to architectural models of his large-scale projects. Bringing together around 320 objects, all of these dimensions of Le Corbusier’s artistic process, including major paintings and four reconstructed interiors, are presented in MoMA’s first comprehensive exhibition of his work. Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes is divided into five sections, and begins with one of four room-sized interiors built especially for the exhibition. Featuring original furniture, the interiors vividly present Le Corbusier’s concepts for domestic landscapes, and the notion of houses operating as machines to view landscapes. The first interior on view is the Cabanon of Le Corbusier from Roquebrune-Cap-Martin (1951–52), installed in the area outside the Tisch galleries. A cabin built on the coast of the gulf of Monte Carlo as a summer haven for Le Corbusier himself, the Cabanon’s interior dimensions are based on those of the Modulor, a system of harmonic proportions Le Corbusier had created in the 1940s. The Cabanaon features rustic elements—bark-covered exterior planks and furniture—crafted by the carpenter Charles Barberis.





FROM THE JURA MOUNTAINS TO THE WIDE WORLD
The first section within the galleries is devoted to Le Corbusier’s early life, in his hometown of La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland. Under the direction of his teacher, Charles L’Eplattenier, Le Corbusier learned to draw, exploring the landscape of the Jura mountains, before focusing on architecture and completing his first house at the age of 20. Over the next five years Le Corbusier discovered the horizons of Europe. In 1907 he made an initial study trip to Italy, followed by a visit to Vienna. In 1908–09 he worked in the Paris studio of the Perret brothers, pioneers in the use of reinforced concrete. He then travelled to Germany in order to study urbanism, working in
Berlin in the studio of Peter Behrens, and in 1911 journeyed to Greece and Istanbul via the Balkans. These travels around Europe are represented in the exhibition with an extraordinary selection of watercolors and pencil drawings. Sketchbooks, both large and small, reveal through hundreds of drawings the time spent observing landscapes of cities and the countryside.
Upon returning to La Chaux-de-Fonds in 1912, Le Corbusier began teaching architecture and interior design. He also built several houses in which he drew upon the experiences of his travels, such as the Villa Jeanneret-Perret, also known as the Maison Blanche, which he designed for his parents. Blueprints from his time in La Chaux-de-Fonds and a room-sized interior of the Maison Blanche (1912) with the original furniture are both on view. Based on a collection of shapes observed during his journeys, the house was a break from the regional style of the area and Le Corbusier’s first work as an independent architect.





THE CONQUEST OF PARIS
The second section focuses on Le Corbusier’s time in Paris, whose sites and monuments he drew tirelessly. In addition to his prolific writing at this time, Le Corbusier painted assiduously, arranging on the canvas objects of daily life as if they were forming landscapes. Among these are La Cheminée (1918), his first painting, Still Life (1920), Guitare verticale – premiere version (1920), and Nature morte du Pavillon de l’Esprit nouveau (1924).
In 1922 he opened an architecture studio with his cousin Pierre Jeanneret (1896–1967). They would work together until 1940, as he conducted two sets of projects in parallel. On the one hand, he developed theoretical schemes, such as the “Citrohan” house (1920), the “immeublevillas” (villa apartments), the “Ville contemporaine” (Contemporary City) (1922), and the “Plan Voisin” for Paris (1925), each of which is represented in the exhibition through drawings. On the other, Le Corbusier built villas for the elite of the French capital, in which he experimented with his provocative ideas for a new architecture made possible by reinforced concrete. These are
represented in the exhibition through models and drawings. The third room-sized interior on view is from one such villa, the Pavilion for the Villa Church in Ville d’Avray (1927–29), a project for an American couple, Henry and Barbara Church. Working with a pre-existing neoclassical structure, Le Corbusier transformed it into a music pavilion with a library in which a rectangular window delimited the view of the surrounding garden as if it were a painting. Surrounded by a largeframe, the window provided the backdrop for an interior landscape where furniture designed in
1928 by Charlotte Perriand, Le Corbusier, and Pierre Jeanneret was used in a domestic setting for the first time.
RESPONDING TO LANSCAPE FROM AFRICA TO THE AMERICAS
The third section focuses on the late 1920s, when Le Corbusier abandoned the prismatic forms he used in his houses of that decade and developed an architecture that was more attentive to landscape, echoing transformations in his painting style, which is represented here by a number of canvases. He greatly expanded the geographic range of his endeavors while continuing to work on his projects for Paris.
His first European success came in 1928 during a triumphant visit to Moscow, where he received the commission for a ministry building, the Centrosoyuz, completed in 1936 (though he was defeated in the competition for the Palace of the Soviets in 1932, the original model of which—from MoMA’s own collection—is on view). Le Corbusier’s accomplishments reverberated around the globe due to the success of his books, which in turn increased the impact of his buildings. His encounters with new landscapes transformed his way of thinking. In 1929 his successful lecture tour of South America led him to develop plans for Rio de Janeiro, Montevideo, and São Paulo. However, the enthusiastic welcome of local elites did not guarantee the success of his projects. Le Corbusier sought in vain for 12 years to carry out his provocative plan for Algiers, shown in the exhibition through numerous drawings, sketches, and an original 1945 model of the skyscraper he designed for Algiers. Among the diverse techniques used by Le Corbusier to persuade the public of the truth of his analyses and projects, lectures played a prominent role. It was in front of the audience that he developed directly, drawing on long sheets of paper, his main ideas and proposals; some of these monumental drawings are on view in the section.
You may visit my blog to see Moma's past exhibitions news  Japanese Contellation, Conception of Space,and Le Corbusier: Atlas of Modern Landscapes to click below links.
http://mymagicalattic.blogspot.com.tr/2016/04/a-japanese-constellation-toyo-ito-sanaa.html
http://mymagicalattic.blogspot.com.tr/2014/09/conception-of-space-at-museum-of-modern.html
http://mymagicalattic.blogspot.com.tr/2013/08/cut-n-paste-from-architectural.html


 A






PHILIPS PAVILION BRUSSELS 1958






PHILIPS PAVILION BRUSSELS 1958










URBAN PLAN FOR RIO DE JANEIRO 1929 






PLANS FOR ALGIERS AND BARCELONA AND 'VERTICAL GARDEN CITY' 1927






PLAN OBUS - ALGIERS 1932












CHAPELLE NOTRE – DAME DU HAUT, RONCHAMP 1950 – 1955






CHAPELLE NOTRE-DAME DU HAUT RONCHAMP 1950-1955
Top to bottom: Elevation of the East Facade (Inverted), Elevation of the 
Southwest Facade Corner, and Transverse North-South Section with Campanile.
Pencil, Colored Pencil, and Pastel on Vellum.
Dimensions: 58.4 x 55.2 cm
Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris.
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC














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POLYHEME 1955
Black ink, Newspaper and Collage on Paper
Dimensions : H : 0,635 m x L : 0,48 m
Fondation Le Corbusier Paris




CAPITOL COMPLEX CHANDIGARH 1951 - 1965
Ink and Pencil on Vellum.
Dimensions: 89 x 152 cm
Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC




BONJOUR CALDER 1958
Wool Tapestry
Dimensions : H : 2,20 m x L : 2,98 m
Fondation Le Corbusier Paris






ETUDE QUATRE MAINS 1955
Oil on Canvas
Dimensions : H : 038 m x L : 0,46 m
Fondation Le Corbusier Paris




PALACE OF THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS –GENEVA 1927
Axonometric View From the West.
Gelatin Print on Paper With Ink, Airbrush and Collage Additions.
Dimensions: 135.5 x 147 cm
Institut fur Geschichte und Theorie der Architektur, ETH Zurich





NATURE MORTE ( STILL LIFE ) 1920
Oil on Canvas.
Dimensions: 80.9 x 99.7 cm
The Museum of Modern Art, New York.Van Gogh Purchase Fund, 1937.
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC










MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NEW YORK




MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NEW YORK
Founded in 1929 as an educational institution, The Museum of Modern Art is dedicated to being the foremost museum of modern art in the world.
Through the leadership of its Trustees and staff, The Museum of Modern Art manifests this commitment by establishing, preserving, and documenting a collection of the highest order that reflects the vitality, complexity and unfolding patterns of modern and contemporary art; by presenting exhibitions and educational programs of unparalleled significance; by sustaining a library, archives, and conservation laboratory that are recognized as international centers of research; and by supporting scholarship and publications of preeminent intellectual merit.
Central to The Museum of Modern Art’s mission is the encouragement of an ever-deeper understanding and enjoyment of modern and contemporary art by the diverse local, national, and international audiences that it serves. You may read more about MoMA’s entire information to click below link.
http://press.moma.org/about/






DR. GLENN D. LOWRY DIRECTOR OF MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NEW YORK












DR. GLENN D. LOWRY DIRECTOR OF MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NEW YORK




MUSEUM OF MODERN ART NEW YORK












MUSEUM IN AHMEDABAD




HIGH COURT




CARPENTER CENTER








LA MAIN OUVERTE 1954
Watercolour and Paper Mounted on Paper
Dimensions : H : 0,21 m x L : 0,27 m
Fondation Le Corbusier Paris




LES DES SONT JETES 1960
Wool Tapestry
Dimensions : H : 2,18 m x L : 3,55 m
Fondation Le Corbusier Paris




PLAN FOR BUENOS AIRES 1929
Profile View From the Rio de la Plata.
Pastel on paper.30 11/16 x 44 7/8” (78 x 114 cm).
Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris.
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/FLC




TROIS FEMMES SUR FOND BLANC 1950
Wool Tapestry
Dimensions : H : 2,20 m x L : 3,00 m
Signed and dated at middle bottom Le Corbusier 50
Fondation Le Corbusier Paris




PEINTURE MURALE, 35 RUE DE SEVRES A PARIS 1948
Oil on Plywood
Dimensions : H : 3,82 m x L : 3,50 m
Fondation Le Corbusier Paris














MUSIC PAVILION FOR VILLA CHURCH – VILLE D’AVRAY 1927 - 1929
General Axonometric View of the Pavilion in the Site, 1927
Ink, Pencil and Colored Pencil on Tracing Paper
Dimensions: 92 x 44 cm
Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris.
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/FLC






ASSEMBLY CHANDIGARH 1961 - 1964
Model of the Roof Structure, 1964.
Plaster and Painted Wood
Dimensions: 81 x 114.5 x 115.5 cm
The Museum of Modern Art.Gift of Barbara Jakobson and the
Architecture & Design Purchase Fund, 2010.
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/FLC












UNITED’HABITATION MARSEILLE 1946 – 1952








UNITE D’HABITATION MARSEILLE 1946 - 1952
View of the Model of the Roof Terrace, Mounted on a
Background of the Provence Landscape.
Silver Gelatin Print Mounted on Paper
Dimensions: 10 x 18 cm
Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC








LE CORBUSIER AT HIS PARIS STUDIO 1954
PHOTOGRAPH BY ERNST SCHEIDEGGER






VOISIN PLAN FOR PARIS 1925
Axonometric View With the Saint-Denis and Saint-Martin Gates
Ink, Pencil, and Colored Pencil on Paper
Dimensions: 74 x 102 cm
Fondation Le Corbusier, Paris.
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris / FLC








CENTER OF LE CORBUSIER






NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WESTERN ART  TOKYO




VILLA SAVOYE POISSY 1928 – 1931








VILLA SAVOYE, POISSY 1928 - 1931
Patio - Photograph 2012.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Gift of Elise Jaffe + Jeffrey Brown.
Photo © 2013 Richard Pare




VILLA SAVOYE POISSY 1928 – 1931
Photograph 2012
The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Gift of Elise Jaffe + Jeffrey Brown.
Photo © 2013 Richard Pare




VILLA JEANNERET – PERRET, LA CHAUX DE FONDS 1912
Photograph. 2012.
© 2013 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris/FLC
Photo © Richard Pare














CHANDIGARH: A NEW URBAN LANDSCAPE FOR INDIA
After 1945 Le Corbusier would face new frustrations when the headquarters of the United Nations in New York were built by Wallace K. Harrison, based on sketches by Le Corbusier and Oscar Niemeyer. But he finally managed to design an entire city, the only one in his career, as the result of a commission from the Indian government. Le Corbusier developed the plan for Chandigarh, the new capital of the Indian state of Punjab, a project that enabled him to implement, over a vast territory, ideas developed 30 years earlier in relation to ancient Rome. Numerous drawings, sketches, and models of Chandigarh are on view. The flights he took twice a year between Europe and India provided the opportunity for him to practice “the view of the airplane,” as he termed it. The sketches on view retain the countless traces of his observations of continents, islands, and mountains. If the architecture of the 1920s was strongly related to his paintings, that of the 1950s echoed his sculptures, from works in wood produced by the Breton cabinet-maker Joseph Savina to sand-casts he developed in Long Island with Costantino Nivola. Le Corbusier also continued his
work as an author, publishing numerous books. With the Modulor, a system of harmonic proportions unveiled in New York in 1947, and on behalf of the "Synthesis of the Arts," he aimed to become the central figure of a modern architecture that was almost universally accepted by that time.
TOWARD THE MEDITERRANEAN, OR THE ETERNAL RETURN
During the last 15 years of his life, Le Corbusier appeared to achieve many of the objectives he had been pursuing for decades. He finally realized a building in the United States, the Carpenter Center at Harvard University, as well as five large residential units, including his building in Marseille. This project for a “unité d'habitation” (“housing unit”), or a “vertical garden city,” was developed in 1945 and commissioned for the rehousing of people left homeless by the war. In Marseille, for the 337 double-height apartments assembled on a reinforced concrete frame, Le
Corbusier used the proportions of the Modulor to design the elements of the building. The roughness of the surfaces and the traces of wooden formwork that resulted from the lack of sufficient skilled labor led him to assert the beauty of “rough” concrete. The interiors resulted from a collective effort. The built-in kitchen cupboards, designed by Charlotte Perriand, and the steel stairways, designed by Jean Prouvé, are complemented by elegant shelves. The loggias became an intermediary space between the interiors and the Provencal landscape. The building is represented in the exhibition through models, photos, drawings, and the final room-sized interior.
Toward the end of his career the question of landscape remained central to Le Corbusier's work, and he strove to respond to geography whether in the east of France, at Ronchamp, or in the region of Lyon at La Tourette. The hospital that he designed in Venice beginning in 1962 transposed the reflections he had made during the 1930s, and is represented through drawings, models, and plans.

You may visit MoMA’s Architectural department exhibitions news of Conceptions of Space and Cut 'n' Paste From Architectural Assemblage to Collage City  both curated by Pedro Gadanho  to click below links.
http://mymagicalattic.blogspot.com.tr/2014/09/conception-of-space-at-museum-of-modern.html
http://mymagicalattic.blogspot.com.tr/2013/08/cut-n-paste-from-architectural.html




LE CORBUSIER 1887 – 1965
( French, Born Switzerland )