March 02, 2014

ITALIAN FUTURISM AT SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM




ITALIAN FUTURISM: 1909 – 1944: RECONSTRUCTING THE UNIVERSE
SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM
February 21, 2014 - September 1, 2014




ITALIAN FUTURISM: 1909 – 1944: RECONSTRUCTING THE UNIVERSE
SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM
February 21, 2014 - September 1, 2014
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Italian Futurism, 1909 - 1944: Reconstructing the Universe, the first comprehensive overview in the United States of one of Europe’s most important 20th-century avantgarde movements. Featuring over 360 works by more than 80 artists, architects, designers, photographers, and writers, this multidisciplinary exhibition examines the full historical breadth of Futurism, from its 1909 inception with the publication of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s first Futurist manifesto through its demise at the end of World War II. The exhibition includes many rarely seen works, some of which have never traveled outside of Italy. It encompasses not only painting and sculpture, but also the advertising, architecture, ceramics, design, fashion, film, free-form poetry, photography, performance, publications, music, and theater of this dynamic and often contentious
movement that championed modernity and insurgency.
The exhibition is organized by Vivien Greene, Senior Curator, 19th- and Early 20th-Century Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. An international advisory committee composed of eminent scholars from many disciplines provided expertise and guidance in the preparation of this thorough exploration of the Futurist movement, a major modernist expression that in many ways remains little known among American audiences.
The Leadership Committee for Italian Futurism, 1909 - 1944: Reconstructing the Universe is also gratefully acknowledged for its generosity, including the Hansjörg Wyss Charitable Endowment; Stefano and Carole Acunto; Giancarla and Luciano Berti; Ginevra Caltagirone; Massimo and Sonia Cirulli Archive; Daniela Memmo d’Amelio; Achim Moeller, Moeller Fine Art; Pellegrini Legacy Trust; and Alberto and Gioietta Vitale.
ABOUT FUTURISM
Futurism was launched in 1909 against a background of growing economic and social upheaval. In Marinetti’s “The Founding and Manifesto of Futurism,” published in Le Figaro, he outlined the movement’s key aims, among them: to abolish the past, to champion modernization, and to extol aggression. Although it began as a literary movement, Futurism soon embraced the visual arts as well as advertising, fashion, music and theater, and it spread throughout Italy and beyond. The Futurists rejected stasis and tradition and drew inspiration from the emerging industry, machinery, and speed of the modern metropolis. The first generation of artists created works characterized by dynamic movement and fractured forms, aspiring to break with existing notions of space and time to place the viewer at the center of the artwork. Extending into many mediums, Futurism was intended to be not just
an artistic idiom but an entirely new way of life. Central to the movement was the concept of the opera d’arte totale or “total work of art,” in which the viewer is surrounded by a completely Futurist environment.
More than two thousand individuals were associated with the movement over its duration. In addition to Marinetti, central figures include: artists Giacomo Balla, Benedetta (Benedetta Cappa Marinetti), Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Fortunato Depero, and Enrico Prampolini; poets and writers Francesco Cangiullo and Rosa Rosà; architect Antonio Sant’Elia; composer Luigi Russolo; photographers Anton Giulio Bragaglia and Tato (Guglielmo Sansoni); dancer Giannina Censi; and ceramicist Tullio d’Albisola. These figures and other lesser-known ones are represented in the exhibition.
Futurism is commonly understood to have had two phases: “heroic” Futurism, which lasted until around 1916, and a later incarnation that arose after World War I and remained active until the early 1940s.
Investigations of “heroic” Futurism have predominated and comparatively few exhibitions have explored the subsequent life of the movement; until now, a comprehensive overview of Italian Futurism had yet to be presented in the U.S. Italian art of the 1920s and ’30s is little known outside of its home country, due in part to a taint from Futurism’s sometime association with Fascism. This association complicates the narrative of this avant-garde and makes it all the more necessary to delve into and clarify its full history.
EXHIBITION OVERVIEW
Italian Futurism unfolds chronologically, juxtaposing works in different mediums as it traces the myriad artistic languages the Futurists employed as their practice evolved over a 35-year period. The exhibition begins with an exploration of the manifesto as an art form, and proceeds to the Futurists’ catalytic encounter with Cubism in 1911, their exploration of near-abstract compositions, and their early efforts in photography. Ascending the rotunda levels of the museum, visitors follow the movement’s progression as it expanded to include architecture, clothing, design, dinnerware, experimental poetry, and toys.
Along the way, it gained new practitioners and underwent several stylistic evolutions—shifting from the fractured spaces of the 1910s to the machine aesthetics ( or arte meccanica ) of the ’20s, and then to the softer, lyrical forms of the ’30s. Aviation’s popularity and nationalist significance in 1930s Italy led to the swirling, often abstracted, aerial imagery of Futurism’s final incarnation, aeropittura. This novel painting approach united the Futurist interest in nationalism, speed, technology, and war with new and dizzying visual perspectives. The fascination with the aerial spread to other mediums, including ceramics, dance, and experimental aerial photography.
The exhibition is enlivened by three films commissioned from documentary filmmaker Jen Sachs, which use archival film footage, documentary photographs, printed matter, writings, recorded declamations, and musical compositions to represent the Futurists’ more ephemeral work and to bring to life their words-in-freedom poems. One film addresses the Futurists’ evening performances and events, called serate, which merged “high” and “low” culture in radical ways and broke down barriers between spectator and performer. Mise-en-scène installations evoke the Futurists’ opera d’arte totale interior ensembles, from those executed for the private sphere to those realized under Fascism. Italian Futurism concludes with the five monumental canvases that compose the Syntheses of Communications ( 1933 – 34 ) by Benedetta ( Benedetta Cappa Marinetti ), which are being shown for the first time outside of their original location. One of few public commissions awarded to a Futurist in the 1930s, the series of paintings was created for the Palazzo delle Poste (Post Office) in Palermo, Sicily.
The paintings celebrate multiple modes of communication, many enabled by technological innovations, and correspond with the themes of modernity and the       “ total work of art ” concept that underpinned the Futurist ethos.

http://www.guggenheim.org/new-york/press-room/releases/5708-guggenheim-museum-presents-unprecedented-survey-of-italian-futurism-opening-in-february

You may read whole manifesto from to click below link 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum's web page.
http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/manifestos/




CARLO CARRA - INTERVENTIONIST DEMONSTRATION 1914 DETAIL




CARLO CARRA - INTERVENTIONIST DEMONSTRATION 1914 
Tempera, pen, mica powder, paper glued on cardboard, 38.5 x 30 cm
Gianni Mattioli Collection, on long-term loan to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice 

© 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / SIAE, Rome
Photo: Courtesy Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York




CARLO CARRA - INTERVENTIONIST DEMONSTRATION 1914 DETAIL






LUIGI RUSSOLO “ THE ART of NOISES: FUTURIST MANIFESTO ” 1913
Wolfsoniana - Fondazione regionale per la Cultura e lo Spettacolo, Genoa
By permission of heirs of the artist - Photo: Courtesy Wolfsoniana 
Fondazione regionale per la Cultura e lo Spettacolo, Genoa






MINO SOMENZI, ED., WITH WORDS-in-FREEDOM IMAGE AIRPLANES by PINO MASNATA
Futurismo 2, no. 32 (Apr. 16, 1933) - Journal (Rome, 1933), 64 x 44 cm
Fonds Alberto Sartoris, Archives de la Construction Moderne–Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL), Switzerland - Photo: Jean-Daniel Chavan










TATO GUGLIELMO SANSONI - FLYING OVER THE COLISEUM IN A SPIRAL 1930 
Oil on canvas, 80 * 80 cm. Ventura Collection, Rome . Photo: Corrado De Grazia




AEROPITTURO
The swirling, sometimes abstracted, aerial imagery of Futurism’s final incarnation, aeropittura ( painting inspired by flight ), arrived by the 1930s. Aeropittura emerged from the Futurists’ interest in modern aircraft and photographic technologies. Propelled by Italy’s military preeminence in aviation, their fascination with the machine shifted focus from the automobile to the airplane. In flight the artists found disorienting points of view and new iconographies to explore in painting, photography, and other mediums.
Evidenced by the work of Tullio Crali, Gerardo Dottori, and Tato, aeropittura represented a novel painting approach that allowed the Futurists to address nationalism, speed, technology, and war, providing radical perspectives that exalted these concepts. Benito Mussolini equated his Fascist regime with the Roman Empire at its peak; not coincidentally, many artworks from the 1930s incorporated imagery from Roman antiquity. Tato’s Flying over the Coliseum in a Spiral ( Spiraling (1930) depicts an airplane soaring over an iconic Italian structure, the circles of the plane’s path echoing the ancient building’s form. The Futurists’ engagement with the aerial quickly expanded beyond painting to other fields, including ceramics, dance, and experimental photography.
http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/aeropittura/index.html




TULLIO CRALI - BEFORE THE PARACHUTE OPENS 1939 DETAIL




TULLIO CRALI - BEFORE THE PARACHUTE OPENS 1939
Oil on Panel 141 * 151 cm. 
Casa Cavazzini, Museo d' Arte Moderna a Contemporanea, Udine, Italy
© 2014 Artists Rights Society -  New York / SIAE, Rome 
Photo: Claudio Marcon, Udine, Civic Musei E Gallerie di Storia e Arte






TULLIO CRALI UPSIDE DOWN LOOP ( DEATH LOOP ) 1938 DETAIL




TULLIO CRALI, UPSIDE DOWN LOOP ( DEATH LOOP )  1938
Oil on panel, 80 x 60 cm. Collection of Luce Marinetti, Rome 
© 2014 Artists Rights SocietyNew York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Studio Boys, Rome




UMBERTO BOCCIONI, STATES of MIND  1911 DETAIL




UMBERTO BOCCIONI, STATES of MIND  1911
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1979.
From top: The Farewells - 1911. Oil on canvas, 70.5 x 96.2 cm; Those Who Go - 1911. Oil on canvas, 70.8 x 95.9 cm; Those Who Stay - 1911. Oil on canvas, 70.8 x 95.9 cm. 
Images © The Museum of Modern Art / Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, New York






FILIPPO MASOERO - DESCENDING OVER SAINT PETER  CA. 1927–37
Gelatin silver print, 24 x 31.5 cm
Touring Club Italiano Archive




PHOTOGRAPHY
Inspired by Henri Bergson’s philosophical ideas on dynamic movement, in late 1911 the Futurist painters began to freely adapt the photographic motion studies of French biophysicist Etienne - Jules Marey and Anglo-American photographer Eadweard Muybridge. Seeking to revitalize painting, Futurist Anton Giulio Bragaglia worked with his brother Arturo Bragaglia, an accomplished photographer, to develop a method of capturing movement they called photodynamism. The pictures on which the Bragaglia brothers collaborated plot the movement of a figure, usually from right to left, with intermediary sections of motion blurred.
Despite their proclaimed interest in new technologies, the Futurists largely neglected photography after these early experiments until the 1930s. In the 1930 “Futurist Photography: Manifesto,” F. T. Marinetti and Tato declared photography to be a powerful tool in the Futurist effort to eliminate barriers between art and life. With the camera, they could explore both “pure” art and art’s social function. Also a designer, graphic artist, and painter, Tato was a leader in Futurist photography and used the camera for diametrically opposed goals; his works express his ideological support of the Fascist regime and reflect his engagement with the absurd.
Futurist photography exhibitions of the 1930s presented avant-garde images that not only reveal an awareness of international modernist currents but also demonstrate strategies specific to the Italians. Futurist photographic techniques include the layering of multiple negatives, perspectival foreshortening, and photomontage. While the 1930s exhibitions included photographs by Bragaglia, the manifesto suggested that the newer photographers’ superimpositions achieved a simultaneous representation of time and space that moved beyond Bragaglia’s photodynamism.
The 1930s also saw the merging of photographic technology with other Futurist art forms, especially dance, painting, and performance inspired by mechanized flight. Meanwhile, photographers Filippo Masoero and Barbara developed novel conceptions of space by photographing Italian cities from an airplane’s cockpit.

http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/photography/index.html




ANTON GIULIO BRAGAGLIA – WAVING – 1911 DETAIL




ANTON GIULIO BRAGAGLIA – WAVING – 1911
Gelatin silver print, 17.5 x 23 cm. Galleria Civica di Modena, Italy 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society -  New York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Francesca Mora




MARIO BELLUSI, MODERN TRAFFIC IN ANCIENT ROME 1930
Photomontage, Gelatin Silver Print
Dimensions: 15 x 20 cm.
Rovereto, MART, Archivio del ’900, Fondo Mino Somenzi.
Photo: © MART, Archivio del ’900










BENEDETTA CAPPA MARINETTI






BENEDETTA CAPPA MARINETTI - SYNTHESIS of AERIAL COMMUNICATIONS 1933–34
Tempera and encaustic on canvas, 324.5 x 199 cm
Il Palazzo delle Poste di Palermo, Sicily, Poste Italiane
© Benedetta Cappa Marinetti, used by permission of Vittoria Marinetti and Luce Marinetti’s heirs - Photo: AGR / Riccardi / Paoloni






GIACOMO BALLA - THE HAND OF THE VIOLINIST - 1912
Oil on canvas, 56 x 78.3 cm - Estorick Collection, London
© 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / SIAE, Rome




ANTONIO SANT’ELIA - STATION FOR TRAINS and AIRPLANES 1914
Pencil and ink on paper, 27.9 x 20.9 cm. Pinacoteca Civica di Como, Italy
Photo: Courtesy Musei Civici Como




ARCHITECTURE
The Futurists celebrated the modern city. Rejecting historicism and seeking to revolutionize urban life, architects Mario Chiattone and Antonio Sant’Elia proposed utopian visions for cities of the future in two series of drawings: Buildings for a Modern Metropolis and Città Nuova (both 1914). Embracing new materials and industrial methods that would alleviate the need for internal load-bearing systems, these designs feature soaring, narrow structures outfitted with thin, lightweight facades. External elevators and viaducts shoot up the spare, windowless planes. The Futurist emphasis on speed is accommodated by unimpeded transportation systems, including facilities for both air and rail travel (see Sant’Elia’s Station for Trains and Airplanes and Tullio Crali’s later plan for a similar center). While Chiattone never defined himself as a Futurist, Sant’Elia outlined the goals of this style in a text that was subsequently edited by Marinetti and issued as “Futurist Architecture: Manifesto” ( 1914 ). These early forays into architecture stressed rhetoric rather than execution and pictorial imaginings took precedence over the specifics of implementation. Sant’Elia died in World War I in 1916 and Chiattone moved in another direction, and their Futurist designs were never built.
By the 1930s, the Fascist state was erecting new public buildings in the clean, spare parlance of Rationalism or the Stile Littorio (which references classical Roman architecture). Neither the complex modern metropolis envisioned by architects such as Chiattone and Sant’Elia nor the theatrical urban buildings dreamed up by Virgilio Marchi were realized. Their successor, Alberto Sartoris, also built few of his designs, and he vacillated between Futurism and Rationalism, exhibiting the same plans under both banners. While he aligned himself with Futurism conceptually, he leaned toward functionalist aesthetics. Sartoris’s axonometric projections eschew superfluous forms in favor of structures that alternate massed volumes with empty space. Crali, better known as a visual artist, also imagined modern envelopes for practical structures, as in his multipurpose Sea Air Rail Terminal. Among the few Futurist structures to be built were temporary ones for fairs, such as those conceived by the multifaceted artist Enrico Prampolini.

http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/architecture/index.html




TULLIO CRALI, SEA AIR RAIL TERMINAL: MARINE CENTER WITH  MOORING BASIN 1930




TULLIO CRALI, SEA AIR RAIL TERMINAL: MARINE CENTER WITH  MOORING BASIN 1930
India ink on paper, 32 x 52.5 cm. 
MART, Museo di Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento e Rovereto, Italy. 
Photo: © MART, Archivio Fotografico




GIACOMO BALLA, PATHS of MOVEMENT + DYNAMIC SEQUENCES 1913
Tempera on paper, mounted on canvas, 49 x 68 cm. 
Gianni Mattioli Collection, on long - term loan to the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society , New York / SIAE, Rome






GIACOMO BALLA - AUTOMOBILE IN CORSA 1913






SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION DESIGN BY FRANK LLOYD WRITE




SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM
FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT • ESTABLISHED IN 1939 • BUILT IN 1959
An internationally renowned art museum and one of the most significant architectural icons of the 20th century, the Guggenheim Museum in New York is at once a vital cultural center, an educational institution, and the heart of an international network of museums. Visitors can experience special exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, lectures by artists and critics, performances and film screenings, classes for teens and adults, and daily tours of the galleries led by museum educators. Founded on a collection of early modern masterpieces, the Guggenheim Museum today is an ever-evolving institution devoted to the art of the 20th century and beyond.
ARCHITECTURE
In 1943, Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design a building to house the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, which had been established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939. In a letter dated June 1, 1943, Hilla Rebay, the curator of the foundation and director of the museum, instructed Wright, “I want a temple of spirit, a monument!”
Wright’s inverted-ziggurat design was not built until 1959. Numerous factors contributed to this 16-year delay: modifications to the design (all told, the architect produced 6 separate sets of plans and 749 drawings), the acquisition of additional property, and the rising costs of building materials following World War II. The death of the museum’s benefactor, Solomon R. Guggenheim, in 1949 further delayed the project. It was not until 1956 that construction of the museum, renamed in Guggenheim’s memory, finally began.
Wright’s masterpiece opened to the public on October 21, 1959, six months after his death, and was immediately recognized as an architectural icon. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum is arguably the most important building of Wright’s late career. A monument to modernism, the unique architecture of the space, with its spiral ramp riding to a domed skylight, continues to thrill visitors and provide a unique forum for the presentation of contemporary art. In the words of critic Paul Goldberger, “Wright’s building made it socially and culturally acceptable for an architect to design a highly expressive, intensely personal museum. In this sense almost every museum of our time is a child of the Guggenheim.”
Wright’s original plans for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum called for a ten-story tower behind the smaller rotunda, to house galleries, offices, workrooms, storage, and private studio apartments. Largely for financial reasons, Wright’s proposed tower went unrealized. In 1990, Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects revived the plan with its eight-story tower, which incorporates the foundation and framing of a smaller 1968 annex designed by Frank Lloyd Wright’s son-in-law, William Wesley Peters.
In 1992, after a major interior renovation, the museum reopened with the entire original Wright building now devoted to exhibition space and completely open to the public for the first time. The tower contains 4,750 square meters of new and renovated gallery space, 130 square meters of new office space, a restored restaurant, and retrofitted support and storage spaces. The tower’s simple facade and grid pattern highlight Wright’s unique spiral design and serves as a backdrop to the rising urban landscape behind the museum.
In 2008, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum was designated a National Historic Landmark; in 2015, along with nine other buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the building was nominated by the United States to be included in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage List.
https://www.guggenheim.org/about-us




























SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM FOUNDATION






LUIGI RUSSOLO - SOLIDITY of FOG - 1912
Oil on canvas, 100 x 65 cm. Gianni Mattioli Collection, on long-term loan to
the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, used by permission




LUIGI RUSSOLO - SOLIDITY of FOG - 1912 DETAIL




GINO SEVERINI - BLUE DANCER – 1912 DETAIL




GINO SEVERINI - BLUE DANCER – 1912
Oil on canvas with sequins, 61 x 46 cm. Gianni Mattioli Collection, on long-term loan to 
the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / ADAGP, Paris






GERARDO DOTTORI - AERIAL BATTLE OVER the GULF of NAPLES or INFERNAL BATTLE OVER the PARADISE of THE GULF - 1942
Oil on plywood panel, 187 x 131 cm. Private collection 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Luca Carrà




ANTON GIULIO BRAGAGLIA - THE TYPIST - 1911.
Gelatin silver print, 11.9 x 16.7 cm. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 
Gilman Collection, Gift of the Howard Gilman Foundation, 2005 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society , New York / SIAE, Rome
Image source: Art Resource, New York © The Metropolitan Museum of Art




GIACOMO BALLA - BALBO AND THE ITALIAN TRANSATLANTIC FLYERS - 1931
Oil on panel, 280 x 150 cm. Museo Storico dell’Aeronautica Militare, Rome 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Massimo Napoli






FORTUNATO DEPERO - HEART EATERS - 1923
Painted wood, 36.5 x 23 x 10 cm
Private collection © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SIAE, Rome
Photo: Vittorio Calore






FRANCESCO CANGIULLO – PIEDIGROTTA - 1916
Book ( Milan: Edizioni futuriste di Poesia ), 26.5 x 18.8 cm. 
The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / SIAE, Rome




WORDS IN FREEDOM
In one of their pivotal inventions, the Futurists conceived a style of free-form, visual poetry called parole in libertà, or “words-in-freedom.” Following F. T. Marinetti’s example, the Futurists liberated words and letters from conventional presentation by destroying syntax, using verbs in the infinitive, eliminating adjectives and adverbs, abolishing punctuation, inserting musical and mathematical symbols, and employing onomatopoeia. Words-in-freedom poems were read as literature, experienced as visual art, and performed as dramatic works. The Futurists published them in multiple formats and declaimed them at the Futurist serate (performative evenings).
While Marinetti introduced the form, many Futurists contributed their own interpretations. A group of pictorially, verbally, and aurally imaginative sketches for words-in-freedom (called tavole parolibere) originated in the revolutionary period of the 1910s. Giacomo Balla invented phonovisual constructions, while Fortunato Depero devised an abstract language of sounds he called onomalingua. Francesco CangiullosLarge Crowd in the Piazza del Popolo (1914) engages the themes of the city, the crowd, and upheaval. The circular structure of Carlo Carrà’s Chronicle of a Milanese Night Owl (1914) captures the sensory whirlwind of voices, sounds, and figures he encountered during a nocturnal walk in Milan.

http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/words_in_freedom/index.html




BENEDETTA CAPPA MARINETTI - SPICOLOGIA OF 1 MAN - 1919 DETAIL




BENEDETTA CAPPA MARINETTI - SPICOLOGIA OF 1 MAN - 1919
India ink on paper, 16 × 16 cm. Private collection © Benedetta Cappa Marinetti,
Used by permission of Vittoria Marinetti and Luce Marinetti's heirs. Photo: Luca Carrà






F. T. MARINETTI - ZANG TUMB TUUUM: ADRIANOPLE OCTOBER 1912; 
Words-in-Freedom Book ( Milan: Edizioni futuriste di Poesia, 1914 ), 20.2 x 14 cm. 
The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society New York / SIAE, Rome




FILIPPO TOMMASO MARINETTI






VIRGILIO MARCHI - BUILDING SEEN FROM A  VEERING AIRPLANE 1919–20
Tempera on canvased paper, 130 x 145 cm. Private collection, Switzerland




PIERO BOCCARDI - COVER OF CATALOGUE FOR EXPERIMENTAL 
EXHIBITION of FUTURIST PHOTOGRAPHY - 1931
Gelatin silver print, 23.9 x 17.3 cm. Collection of Giorgio Grillo, Florence




OSVALDO PERUZZI – AEROPITTURA - CA. 1934
Oil on corrugated board, 64.5 x 80.5 cm. Galleria d’Arte Moderna di Roma Capitale. 
Archivio Fotografico Galleria d’Arte Moderna di Roma Capitale
Photo: © Roma Capitale




TATO GUGLIELMO SANSONI, FANTASTICAL AEROPORTRAIT of MINO SOMENZI 1934
Photomontage, gelatin silver print, 24 x 18 cm. Rovereto, MART, Archivio del ’900, 
Fondo Mino Somenzi. Photo: © MART, Archivio del ’900






F. T. MARINETTI - AIR RAID ( n. 67 ) 1915–16
Ink and pencil on paper, 21.5 x 27.5 cm. Collection of Luce Marinetti, Rome 
© 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Studio Boys, Rome




ENRICO PRAMPOLINI and MARIA RICOTTI, WITH COVER by ENRICO PRAMPOLINI 1927
Program for the Theater of Futurist Pantomime
Illustrated leaflet (Paris: M. et J. De Brunn ), 27.5 x 22.7 cm
Fonds Alberto Sartoris, Archives de la Construction Moderne–Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland - Photo: Jean-Daniel Chavan




FRANCESCO CANGIULLO - LARGE CROWD in THE PIAZZA DEL POPOLO  1914
Watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper, 58 x 74 cm
Private collection © 2014 Artists Rights Society - New York / SIAE, Rome






IVO PANNAGGI - SPEEDING TRAIN 1922
Oil on canvas, 100 x 120 cm
Fondazione Carima–Museo Palazzo Ricci, Macerata, Italy
Photo: Courtesy Fondazione Cassa di risparmio della Provincia di Macerata




ARTE MECANICA
Following World War I, Futurism gained new members and assumed different formal qualities, including those of arte meccanica (machine aesthetics). While mechanized figures and forms had appeared earlier (in the art of Fortunato Depero, for example), Ivo Pannaggi and Vinicio Paladini articulated the principles of this idiom in their 1922 “Manifesto of Futurist Mechanical Art.” Enrico Prampolini also adopted a mechanical language at this time, and he subsequently expanded and signed the manifesto, publishing it in his journal Noi in 1923.
Pannaggi’s Speeding Train (1922) demonstrates the Futurists’ sustained interest in the locomotive as a symbol of modernity, motion, and the machine. The painting depicts a powerful train barreling toward the viewer at a diagonal angle. Speeding Train suggests the total sensory experience of observing the daily trains passing through the small coastal towns along the Adriatic (the blur of the moving cars, the clamorous noise of the motor, the ear-splitting scream of the whistle).
Later, Pannaggi’s interest in machine aesthetics led him to integrate Constructivist elements such as beams, cubes, cylinders, and three-dimensional letters into his work. In 1932–33 he attended the Bauhaus in Germany, the only Futurist aside from Nicolaj Diulgheroff to do so.
http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/arte_meccanica/index.html
You may read '' Heroic Futurism '' and '' Futurist Reconstraction of the Universe '' to click below links. You may search more paintings and photographs to click below Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum's Exhibition links too.
http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/heroic_futurism/index.html

http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/futurism/futurist_reconstruction_of_the_universe/index.html




UGO POZZO - COSMOPOLIZ – 1925 DETAIL




UGO POZZO - COSMOPOLIZ – 1925
Oil on canvas, 100 x 70 cm. Private collection, By permission of heirs of the artist. 
Photo: Courtesy Pozzo Heirs








GIACOMMO BALLA - TRELSI. . . . TRELNO – 1914
Ink on paper, 27 x 20 cm. Private collection © 2014 Artists Rights Society 
New York / SIAE, Rome. Photo: Luca Carrà




FORTUNATE DEPERO, SKYSCRAPERS AND TUNNELS – 1930
Tempera on paper, 68 x 102 cm. MART, Museo di arte moderna e contemporanea di 
Trento e Rovereto, Italy © 2014 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome. 
Photo: © MART, Archivio Fotografico




ITALIAN FUTURISM: 1909 – 1944: RECONSTRUCTING THE UNIVERSE
SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM
February 21, 2014 - September 1, 2014